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Tsakiridis amplifiers suck

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As you can see from the slight shift in this dip when the power level changes, box tuning varies slightly with the test conditions; this is why the impedance measurement, above, indicates 55 Hz as the tuning frequency. Tsakiridis amplifiers suck the highest power level, 25 watts, the maximum distortion is a. When I first unpacked the StudioMonitor s, I was quite impressed with their overall appearance, especially the cabinets' piano-black top and bottom panels.

Tsakiridis amplifiers suck first, I could not figure out how to get the grille cloth off so I could see the drivers, but I soon determined that the top and bottom panels could be removed, as they are attached to the cabinet with four pegs that engage holes in the panels. When a panel is removed, it uncovers Tsakiridis amplifiers suck grille cloth, which is tightened around the cabinet with a captive drawstring. The grille wraps completely around the cabinet and has a cutout at the rear for the input-terminal cup.

When uncovered, the speakers and cabinet had a meticulous, no-nonsense look that showed careful craftsmanship and attention to detail. Under the grille cloth, the enclosure was finished in an attractive satin black.

The SM s are source with wallmounting brackets that screw into routed-out holes on the rear panel a nice touch. The large passive radiator essentially takes up one whole side of the cabinet; in an enclosure this size, it looks like a monster woofer. The radiator is inset " to protect it from damage.

When energized by highlevel sine Tsakiridis amplifiers suck, the speaker sounded quite clean down to 40 Hz, but distortion was audibly significant at lower frequencies. At the box tuning frequency, Tsakiridis amplifiers suck woofer's motion almost ceased and the passive radiator's excursion became quite large.

The deep null in the woofer's excursion showed that the box and the passive radiator work extremely well. At and near the system's tuning frequency, maximum clean Tsakiridis amplifiers suck was about 0.

The effective radiating diameter Tsakiridis amplifiers suck the passive radiator is about more info. This makes the drone cone's radiating area approximately 2.

As I said above, this is good design practice for a passive-radiator system. For my listening, I placed the systems on 24" stands which raised the tweeter to about 34" above the floor about 7 feet apart and well away from room's side walls.

Xnxxxx Syx Watch Wonka fiction erotic Video Amateur hot. I'd tweak them and soup up the motors, race against other kids in the neighborhood - and take their cars home with me. His first real car was a '65 Buick Grandsport, which he raced in suburban Connecticut. The cops would be there, but there were too many of us for them to do much about it. We'd make the windows rattle on the McDonald's. You could get octane Sunoco back then, for 29 cents a gallon. One night, when he was driving alone, a couple of patrol cars pursued him. I made a turn onto a side street, but at the end of it was an entrance to a football field, with two steel posts. I had my lights off, and I ran right into both those posts. They mashed both my fenders, all the way up to my doors. I was just jammed in there and couldn't get out, and the cops arrived and started laughing at me. They'd given me tickets before for speeding and reckless driving. After that I wasn't allowed to drive for four years, so I went into the Air Force. I repaired their welder in five minutes and talked to the guy for three hours about an electric dragster. I said, 'Let's do it! I have 28 batteries, giving volts at 1, amps. The cables are about an inch in diameter. There's less maintenance and no tune-ups, and after each race a recharge from his portable generator costs about 30 cents. I ask him how the car feels when he takes off. I cover the first 60 feet in 1. You feel the acceleration pull your face back. I do one-eighth of a mile in 6 seconds, reaching mph. The last eighth, the performance falls off because I have no transmission. So, this is the right thing to do - for ecology, and to get kids interested in the whole idea. Well, all right! I squeeze into the seat, scraping my knees on the aluminum body and bumping my head on the roll bar. Don't even think of touching it. That would initiate the race sequence. I imagine myself fumbling for it as the car winds up and shoots toward the chain-link perimeter fence feet away. Probably I could hit the switch around the same time the car hit the fence. Still, this is no time to wimp out. I press it, and the car rolls forward. There's no suspension, so I feel every crack in the asphalt. The dragster makes an electric grinding noise, like an old-fashioned streetcar. The "pit area" at Woodburn is a desolate expanse like an abandoned parking lot. Finally I wrestle it back to his trailer. Electronerds race machines crammed full of batteries that deliver surges of power up to 1, amps. A couple hours later the gas-guzzlers arrive: The race fee is only 20 bucks, and you can make as many runs down the track as time permits. I walk among the cars as they line up with their engines rumbling, while the drivers' girlfriends sit on the bleachers eating corn dogs and drinking 7-Up. Then the racing starts, and it sounds as if tigers are being tortured here among the wheat fields. Screaming tires, roaring motors - it's a testosterone-fueled, head-hammering ritual as the drivers pair off like elks banging their antlers together at the start of the mating season. Bearing in mind that "knee trembler" was s Liverpudlian slang for a stand-up blow job, it's no surprise to see the vocabulary of fuel injection and blowers superchargers perverted in a dashboard sticker that reads, "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown. In fact, this event reeks even more of sublimated sex than of exhaust fumes - and the noise is an intrinsic element. He spins the fat tires to warm the rubber for better adhesion, and then - he's gone! His dragster drifts away like a bird on the breeze, easily outpacing his rival, a 5-liter behemoth that bellows futilely as it falls behind. The gasoline-car drivers look at each other as if to say, What the fuck? If a man with a high-powered rifle wandered into a primitive tribe where they'd been duking it out with wooden clubs, I imagine the reaction would be the same. The technology gap is so extreme, it makes the whole game seem pointless. The next day - Saturday - the gas-guzzlers are gone and the pit area is invaded by smart, hairy geeks swigging Evian water and chattering jargon like speed freaks. Every one of them is male, except for some wives and girlfriends. Yes, the electronerds are here - and the bleachers are empty. The event was listed in the track's calendar, but the locals have chosen to stay home. Still, there's no shortage of cars and drivers. Roderick Wilde's Maniac Mazda RX7 is a fearsome creation, crammed full of batteries and looking slightly beat-up, like a prize fighter with a history. John Wayland has brought his White Zombie, cranked to a higher voltage and plastered with slogans: Question internal combustion Plasma Boy Racing. The explosion generated a terrifying ball of blue plasma crackling with electric discharges. Not far away, Don Crabtree, a sewing-machine design engineer, stands by his record-breaking volt motorcycle powered by wheelchair batteries. I wander over to a red Toyota MR2, as shiny as if it just came out of a showroom. Its owner is Bob Boyd, a white-haired Air Force veteran. This is more fun. He retired 24 years ago, but at 78, he still loves speed and, like most electric racers, is a self-taught engineer. So, you learned to do it yourself. Kids who grow up around farms are pretty handy with tools. He consulted John Wayland before tackling his project, then spent about 18 months working on it. So, I built this for fun. It draws up to 1, amps from 16 batteries, volts. To recharge it, I just plug it into a standard volt outlet. Boyd's car is immaculately executed; the only clue that it's not a regular Toyota is the electric plug hiding where a gas filler pipe should be. Boyd financed the conversion without any sponsors. So, I took a pretty nice car and tore it up, converted it. You could do the same thing a lot cheaper. His maximum range is 40 miles between recharges, but he feels this is perfectly adequate. Why don't they drive an electric? It's a whole bunch cheaper, like burning fuel at 14 cents a gallon. And of course it's nonpolluting. But the open combustion of coal or natural gas in power stations is inherently more efficient than an internal combustion engine, which creates noxious gases and a huge amount of waste heat. Also, as Boyd points out, hydroelectric power produces no pollutants at all. Therefore, electric vehicles really do have the potential to reduce emissions nationwide. That's a good description of the StudioMonitor , a member of Definitive Technologies' "Monitor Series" of modestly priced home-theater loudspeakers. Using a ported cabinet instead of. It does this by coupling an acoustic resonant system the enclosure and a portusually a tubethat vents its output into the room to the rear of the speaker's diaphragm. This sets up an acoustic resonance between the mass of air moving in the port and the stiffness of the air in the enclosure. By matching the enclosure and port sizes to the characteristics of the driver, this resonator is typically tuned to a frequency near the lowest frequency the system is intended to reproduce, and radiates low frequencies over a range of roughly two-thirds of an octave around its resonance. If the system is properly designed, far more sound comes from the port within its operating range than from the driver. Because the ported enclosure's acoustic resonant system is typically more linear than the mechanical resonant system of the speaker, its distortion is lower. Below its resonance, unfortunately, the port's output is essentially out of phase with the loudspeaker's, which makes the system's bass output roll off much faster than that of an equivalent closed-box system. There is, however, a catch to all this: At high volume levels, the air in the vent can move fast enough to generate significant turbulence, which causes extraneous noise and limits the port's output. This turbulence can be tamed by increasing the port's area, but that calls for lengthening the port to increase the air mass within it. Otherwise, the box resonance, and hence the shape of the speaker's response curve, will change. For small boxes that are tuned to low frequencies and designed to radiate a lot of acoustic power, enlarging the port's mouth would call for very long port tubes that take up a lot of space in the box; sometimes, tubes that are long enough won't fit! Using a passive radiator sidesteps these problems. Typically, a passive radiator is a speaker frame, cone, surround, and sometimes spider without a magnet and voice coil. Here, the ported-box resonance is a function of the mass of the passive radiator and the compliance of the air trapped in the enclosure. Because it is shallow, the radiator can be made large enough to avoid turbulence while taking up hardly any space within the cabinet. And because the radiator's mass is in-. A properly designed passive radiator requires roughly two to four times the air-moving capability 1. Both active drivers are mounted on the front of the cabinet, with the tweeter on top and offset about an inch to one side. The speakers are provided in mirrorimage pairs, with black, white, or golden-cherry piano-gloss finishes on the top and bottom. The front, sides, and rear are covered in a wrap-around grille cloth, held in place by the removable top and bottom pieces. Connection is through a single pair of gold-plated multiway binding posts, spaced for double banana plugs, on the bottom rear of the cabinet. Cabinet construction is quite heavy-duty for a speaker system of this size and price: The cabinet is well braced and quite solid. The magnetically shielded, 1-inch aluminum-dome tweeter is essentially the same as that used in Definitive Technology's top-of-the-line systems. The inch passive radiator is simply a rigid circular plate with an attached surround. The SM 's crossover is wired on a small PC board mounted near the speaker's input cup and can be reached by removing the cup. The crossover, a second-order design, has an iron-. That's one more resistor and capacitor than usual; the extra components probably act as an impedance-compensating network. As in my previous reviews, I used two different test techniques to measure frequency responses. The test signal for these measurements was the usual 2. The on-axis response of the Studio Monitor is shown in Fig. Only the response with the grille on is shown, because the grille cloth is not designed to be removed; fortunately, the grille had essentially no effect on the SM 's response except for very small deviations of less than 0. The smoothed curve is quite well behaved and fits a tight 2. At higher frequencies, the unsmoothed curve exhibits a sharp dip of about 10 dB at At low frequencies, the system rolls off slowly, reaching -3 dB at 83 Hz, - 6 dB at 63 Hz, and - 9 dB at about 50 Hz which is near the SM 's vented-box resonance. Below 50 Hz, the system rolls off rapidly, about 24 dB per octave, as is common with vented-box systems. However, this curve was measured in free space,. The SM 's horizontal and vertical off-axis frequency responses are shown in Fig. Between 1 and 3 kHz the response shelves downward, the dip worsening as the offaxis angle is increased. There are also significant high-frequency aberrations above 8 kHz at extreme off-axis angles. These aberrations include a dip above 10 kHz, followed by a peak at about 13 kHz. That high-frequency dip and peak are also seen in the responses measured above and below the tweeter's axis. The above-axis curves Fig. Response below axis Fig. Between 3. This implies that these speakers should be aimed above ear level, or possibly be mounted upside down to provide the smoothest response for seated or standing listeners. Luckily, the cabinet bottoms are finished like the tops, although there are four small bumps that serve as feet. Unfortunately, the logos on front of the speakers are upside down when the speakers are inverted. The input impedance magnitude of the StudioMonitor Fig. The two impedance peaks that mark the as a vented box are clearly evident; the impedance minimum 3. The impedance phase Fig. The SM should be an easy load for any competent power amplifier or hometheater receiver. To measure the distortion of the Figs. In this setup, test signals generated by Igor are fed through the USBPre and my amplifier to the s, while signals from my test microphone are fed to the computer through the USBPre, then analyzed and plotted on graphs by Igor. The distortion was evaluated at each frequency by applying a sine wave to the system for one half second and then evaluating the harmonic distortion of the system's output, measuring the total energy of the 2nd through 5th harmonics by using FFT Fast Fourier Transform to compute the frequency spectrum of that output. Results are expressed as a percentage of the fundamental's signal level, not as a percentage of the total output. The harmonic distortion at each frequency was evaluated at three different power levels, 6 dB apart. At the power levels I used for this test, the distortion did not become irritating until the test frequency dropped below 45 Hz. The SM woofer's intermodulation distortion IM was measured with the same power levels and test conditions as in the harmonic distortion test but over a slightly different range of frequencies. For this test, I applied two tones of equal level, one fixed at Hz, the other varying from The dual-tone test signals were applied to the speaker for one half second each. The test results, expressed as a percentage of the energy of the two original test tones, represent the total energy of three intermodulation sidebands above and three below the higher test frequency. The IM Fig. For frequencies above Hz, the harmonic distortion percentage stays roughly constant and generally doubles when the input power does. Below Hz, the distortion reaches a maximum at about 70 Hz, falls to a. The dip in the vicinity of 50 Hz coincides with the system's ventedbox tuning frequency, where the passive radiator is producing most of the sound. As you can see from the slight shift in this dip when the power level changes, box tuning varies slightly with the test conditions; this is why the impedance measurement, above, indicates 55 Hz as the tuning frequency. At the highest power level, 25 watts, the maximum distortion is a. When I first unpacked the StudioMonitor s, I was quite impressed with their overall appearance, especially the cabinets' piano-black top and bottom panels. At first, I could not figure out how to get the grille cloth off so I could see the drivers, but I soon determined that the top and bottom panels could be removed, as they are attached to the cabinet with four pegs that engage holes in the panels. When a panel is removed, it uncovers the grille cloth, which is tightened around the cabinet with a captive drawstring. The grille wraps completely around the cabinet and has a cutout at the rear for the input-terminal cup. When uncovered, the speakers and cabinet had a meticulous, no-nonsense look that showed careful craftsmanship and attention to detail. Under the grille cloth, the enclosure was finished in an attractive satin black. The SM s are provided with wallmounting brackets that screw into routed-out holes on the rear panel a nice touch. The large passive radiator essentially takes up one whole side of the cabinet; in an enclosure this size, it looks like a monster woofer. The radiator is inset " to protect it from damage. When energized by highlevel sine waves, the speaker sounded quite clean down to 40 Hz, but distortion was audibly significant at lower frequencies. At the box tuning frequency, the woofer's motion almost ceased and the passive radiator's excursion became quite large. The deep null in the woofer's excursion showed that the box and the passive radiator work extremely well. At and near the system's tuning frequency, maximum clean excursion was about 0. The effective radiating diameter of the passive radiator is about 8. This makes the drone cone's radiating area approximately 2. As I said above, this is good design practice for a passive-radiator system. For my listening, I placed the systems on 24" stands which raised the tweeter to about 34" above the floor about 7 feet apart and well away from room's side walls. The LED level monitors on my power amplifier showed that the amp was working noticeably less hard when driving the SM s. The SM s performed admirably on recordings with high peak content, which profit from high playback levelsbig-band material with prominent brass sections and drum rim shots, for example. With the peakexercising special effects on Ein Straussfest Telarc CDone of my favorites, even though it dates back to ! However, when I got carried away with the volume control on some of the Telarc CD's very loud low-bass passages, I could overload the s severely. The s' bass response was quite adequate on most of the material I listened to. On shaped tone bursts, bass response was quite acceptable down to 50 Hz, with usable output at 40 Hzbut not at lower frequencies. Teaming the s up with a subwoofer improved the sound significantly, putting the s on a more equal footing with the much larger s. On well-recorded female vocals, the s did exhibit some slight uppermidrange irregularities, but on highfrequency sibilants they did quite well, reproducing them without harshness, strain, or spittiness. After my lab tests revealed high-frequency response aberrations caused by the tweeter resonance mentioned earlier, I listened to the speakers again, but could hear no problems caused by this. Although my hearing, at this point, is rolled off in the range of this resonance, I sometimes can detect the subharmonics of such resonances. The s were the full equal of the s on male speaking voices. With the speakers turned upside down, the sound heard from a standing position matched the on-axis sound more closely. Differences were much less evident with music than with pink noise. The imaging and soundstaging of the s were excellent. Mono center images were quite stable and did not shift when the recording's frequency content changed. The s did extremely well on classical a cappella choral music, reproducing the voices and the room's reverberant sound with great precision. Considering their reasonable price, good looks, and great sound, I highly recommend the Definitive Technology StudioMonitor speakers for stereo use or for a home theater setup. With a competent subwoofer, they provide real competition for many much larger systems. Their high sensitivity and smooth response will be welcome in any music system. Don Keele. Genelec Inc. Tested samples on loan from manufacturer. No audio component is perfect, and speakers are the least perfect of all. The imperfections of other components can be too small for anyone to hear, but speakersall of themhave readily audible deficiencies. The virtue of "active," or powered, speakers is that their electronics can make those defects far less audible: Dedicated electronic equalizers can minimize the speaker's frequency-response errors. Built-in amplifiers can provide the exact power that the speaker or, better yet, each driver requires and, if each driver is powered separately, precise active crossovers can be employed instead of cruder, passive ones. What's more, protective circuitry can be custom-tailored to the drivers it safeguards. Despite their obvious potential for. Why buy power again? The complexity of modern audio and home theater systems may change that. In the days of stereo, all you needed was a record player, a tuner, a tape deck, a preamplifier, and a stereo power amplifier, plus five shelves to hold everything. Today, you might have seven source components, a preamplifier, satellite receiver, and an equalizer well, I do. Who has rack space for an additional seven or eight channels' worth of amplifiers? I sure don't. So I use active speakers throughout my 7. Genelec is a fairly new name in the consumer market, but this Finnish company's active speakers are highly regarded and widely used in pro sound, where active speakers have long been common. Now, the company is angling for consumer sales, with several series of active home-theater speakers. The HT is the larger two-way speaker system in the Intimate Home Theater series there's also a three-way system , recommended for rooms of 3, to 4, cubic feet; other series are designed for rooms of under 3,, 5, to 10,, and over 10, cubic feet. The line also includes an in-wall model and two subwoofers. The HT has a inch woofer, which is unusual in a two-way speaker. The primary reason you don't see. Passive crossovers can have little or no influence on directivity, especially while retaining smooth response off axis. Better-performing satellites use 6- or 6-inch woofers at most, because such drivers are the largest ones capable of offering both a reasonable low-frequency extension and a woofer directivity that closely matches the tweeter's near the crossover 1. With electronic crossovers the designer can play a few little trade-off games regarding directivity; in the case of the HT, however, the excellent directivity over the entire operating range from 42 Hz to 22 kHz, despite the comparatively large woofer, appears to be due to the shallow, hornlike "Directivity Control Waveguide" surrounding the tweeter. The HT has two internal amplifiers: Genelec doesn't say what the hell "short-term" watts are, but who cares? Amplifier power ratings for active speakers powered subwoofers included have no signif-. We need to know how much energy comes out of the speaker, not how much energy goes in to produce that output. Of course, if manufacturer X gets dB SPL with a 2,watt amplifier and manufacturer Y does it with 20 watts, I might prefer the latter because it's easier on my electric bill. An "Autostart" function turns the unit off if no signal has been present for 5 minutes, but restarts it immediately when a new signal is received. Additional controls on the rear panel wouldn't remote controls be cool? Units currently in production have two additional features: Users will be able to select whether the LEDs remain off, show only yellow for standby and green for operation, or also show red for overload. The speaker is magnetically shielded, so you can use it near a TV set or other cathode-ray tube CRT display. The HT is relatively large for a satellite speaker. With its bass response specified as Although it has a small, 1-foot-square footprint, the cabinet occupies 2. However, HTs are now available in glossy piano black and three wood-veneer finishes, all complete with grilles prices not established at press time. As I did not have the grilles, I could. The tweeter waveguide plate can be removed and rotated 90 so the Genelec logo will be upright if you mount the speaker horizontally. The electronics panel on the rear is resiliently mounted, a pro-sound carryover that protects the system against rough handling on tour. The enclosure seems relatively tourproof, too: How did the Genelec HT measure up? Let's discuss how it performed in the lab first. Basic measurements were taken at 2 meters in my large, 7,cubic-foot, room; maximum output for a stereo-arrayed pair was measured at 4 meters in the same room. The horizontal response graph Fig. Directly on axis, its response fits in a 3 dB window from 55 Hz to 20 kHz, shelved up by approximately 2 dB between 1 and 10 kHz. Horizontal directivity is remarkably smooth and wide. This is not due to some kind of electronic trickery; there is no suggestion to that effect in Genelec's specs and literature. As it is most unusual for a inch two-way system to work this well off axis, the explanation probably lies, as I suggested earlier, in the shallow, hornlike baffle "Directivity Control Waveguide" of the tweeter. Vertical radiation patterns Fig. Below the axis, there's a sharp, deep notch at 1. Above-axis response is smooth to about 20, with notching near the crossover frequency as the angle increases. These problems are common when multiway speakers have drivers placed side by side or when vertically arrayed systems are used horizontally. I beg people with multiple listening seats to use a vertically arrayed center channel. The HT should be used vertically whenever possible, and when used for a center channel should preferably be placed below the screen. For example, the DIP switch for Bass Roll-Off a highpass filter whose slope increases from 6 to 12 dB per octave in small steps indicates cuts of 2, 4, 6, and 8 dB for frequencies below Hz, but setting the switch at -8 dB only cut response by only a little more than 5 dB. Likewise, the Bass Tilt switch which should cut 2, 4, or 6 dB below 1 kHz, depending upon its setting produced a 4 dB reduction when set in the -6 dB position. The tweeter and woofer can be turned off individually when the Mute position on the driver's DIP switch is selectedwhile this is a fantastic feature for nearfield measuring it is of no use I can think of for home listening. For a two-way satellite, the HT delivered a healthy output, though not quite as healthy as suggested by Genelec's specification dB peak per pair at 1 meter, with music. The HT's low-frequency abilities were similar to those of many "fullrange" floor-standing loudspeakers I've used. Speakers seldom have the lowfrequency dynamic capability that reference measurement levels imply. Frequently, full-range models whose measured low-frequency extension seems impressive exhibit an upward spectral balance shift at high output. To measure the Genelec's low-frequency abilities, I used a technique adopted from Don Keele: I fed the speaker ramped, 6. This is because the speaker is just leaving its linear output range at that point; as the level increases further, distortion will begin increasing exponentially. Surprisingly few two-way satellites or even full-range speakers can deliver such usable output at 40 Hz. However, the HT's usable output at 40 Hz was nearly 25 dB below its maximum clean output at higher frequencies, which occasionally caused the spectral balance shift described previously. If you want full-bandwidth dynamic capability, you'll need to use the Genelec with a subwoofer. I listened to the HT as a stereo pair. The sound was clean and clear, although somewhat aggressive. With the Treble Tilt switch set to 0 dB, there was excessive sibilance when playing Suzanne Vega's recording of "Tom's Diner" on Solitude Standing and percussion sounded somewhat overemphasized. When I set the Treble Tilt switch to -4 dB, however, voices and acoustic instruments were rendered with natural timbre and excellent detail and clarity, although the speaker still sounded slightly aggressive. The Genelecs delivered a wide, moderately deep soundstage, with excellent image placement and separation. Dynamically, the H T 2 1 0 plays damn loud, yet retains its clarity when the music gets soft or is simply played softly. There is some, but less than usual, upward spectral shift when playing full-range recordings at very loud levels. When played at full gain with ultraloud, dynamic, or ultracompressed program material Radiohead's Amnesiac, Fugees' Blunted on Reality, Jay Leonhart's Salamander Pie the H T 2 1 0 could play roughly 3 dB beyond its clean limit. At such high levels, the Genelec's limiters keep turning on and off and the sound is sometimes grossly distorted. I used hearing protection when checking this. But when you're finished abusing the speaker, there will be no burned or bottomed voice coils, and the system will play as if it were still new. The Genelec HT will reward any listener with high-quality, highoutput playback in mono, stereo, and multichannel music and film systems. It has more output capability than any other two-way home system I've ever used, and more than many inch towers. As a satellite speaker, it's a little on the large side. As a full-range speaker, it's moderate in size but with the impact of many larger floor-standing systems. Like all satellite and most full-range systems it will benefit from a subwoofer if you like high-impact low-frequency programs. As far as I'm concerned, these Genelecs would be welcome in my house anytime. Tom Nousaine. Model CS1. The CS1. That look is part of Thiel's "Coherent Source" design, which, the company says, aims to eliminate "time and phase distortions that cause alterations in the reproduced musical waveforms of most loudspeakers. The front panel is claimed to reduce parasitic resonances, and its rounded corners minimize diffraction. Thiel also uses widebandwidth drivers and true, first-order crossovers to maintain phase coherence. The result, says Thiel, is enhanced realism, clarity, transparency and immediacy, as well as improved imaging and a deeper soundstage. The woofer's construction is unusual. Instead of placing a small voice coil at the apex of a deep woofer cone, Thiel gave the CS1. This design distributes the driving force over a larger area and, by reducing the unsupported span between the coil and the cone's edge, re-. According to Thiel, it also moves the diaphragm's spurious resonances to a much higher frequency, and hence raises the driver's high-frequency cutoff. As a result of this driving system, the woofer's cone is quite shallow and its dustcap is distinctively large. The large voice coil enables Thiel to place the neodymium magnet inside the pole piece rather than outside it. This topology provides magnetic shielding; when I set a CS1. The woofer's extended response is a necessity, because of the CS1. The virtues claimed for first-order crossovers, which have gentle slopes of 6 dB per octave, are simple construction typically, one capacitor and one inductor and "phase coherence" the elimination of phase changes at the crossover frequency. The theory is that a first-order crossover keeps the two drivers in quadrature 90 apart at all frequencies, and consequently the sum of the two drivers' acoustic outputs is theoretically a perfect replica of the crossover's input. The importance of this from the standpoint of audibility has long been debated and belongs in another discussion. It's also necessary to have loudspeaker drivers that operate cleanly for two to three octaves beyond the crossover point. This is because moving-coil drivers are second-order devices, which roll off at 12 dB per octave outside their natural passband. Only very wideband drivers allow the system's roll-off to start well before the drivers'. A firstorder crossover's gentle slope also does little to suppress any irregularities in the driver's response outside its passband. So using such drivers not only requires an extended upper range for the woofer, but also a downward ex-. Thiel says quite a bit about technologies that extend the response of the CSl. Nonetheless, I neither heard nor measured any of the anomalies I'd expect if the tweeter lacked low-end response or had insufficient power handling at low frequencies. Despite the appealing simplicity of basic first-order filter design, it often. Thiel's literature says that the company's speakers "make extensive use of network compensation. The recess flares outward rapidly to a width of 4 inches at the panel's front surface. Thiel says this design reduces unwanted port noise, and my experience with the speaker backs that up. According to the company, the port design also reduces "grille loading effects," andhallelujah! However, that may have more. Magnets hidden beneath the cabinet surface hold the grille to the front baffle, eliminating grille frames and other constructions that could affect response. That baffle, by the way, is 2 inches thick, and the other enclosure panels are an inch thick, stiffening the cabinet and minimizing secondary radiation. The cabinet is not only stiff but beautifully finished, something Thiel is known for. Buyers have their choice of 15 fine cabinet finishes, at several price levels. At the other end of the scale, a pair of CS1. Custom finishes are also available. Connections are made via heavyduty multiway binding posts on the rear panel. They are not on -inch centers, so they won't accept double banana plugs, but single banana plugs work fine. By the way, you can easily convert a dual banana plug into a pair of singles with diagonal cutters. There is only one pair of connecting posts per speaker, because Thiel doesn't believe biamping or biwiring are necessary neither do I. But the company also says that it does not use separate woofer and tweeter connections. Warranty is 10 years to the original owners for any defects in material and workmanship. My basic measurements of die Thiel CS1. I also supplemented the quasianechoic measurements with 2-meter readings taken with the speaker standing on a carpeted floor to replicate normal use. In my opinion, measurements of performance on a floor should always be used when designing and evaluating a tower speaker, because its proximity to the floor will affect its response in any listening room. Floors also affect the response of stand- or shelfmounted speakers, but the effects will vary with the height at which the speaker is mounted. The characteristic on-axis response of the CS1. At higher frequencies, response slopes gently downward at approximately 3 dB per octave. Off-axis response in the horizontal plane Fig. Vertically, response deteriorates rapidly above axis Fig. Radiation below the axis Fig. On the other hand, the clever grille has virtually zero effect on the response. Sensitivity is 90 dB SPL at 1 meter with 2. From Hz up, its impedance is 4 ohms or less, reaching its minimum 3. I use a ramped 6. At this point, the speaker still sounds clean, but distortion begins increasing exponentially with further increases in level. While the CS1. Two-channel listening may be officially dead in this home-theater era, but I listened to the CS1. Even stereo can mask some operating deficiencies, and Floyd Toole makes a good case for using a single speaker system for listening evaluations. Spectral balance and dynamics can surely be tested in this way. Certain spatial characteristics, such as openness the ability to make sound seem independent of its actual source and reproduction of ambience, can also be fairly evaluated with a single channel. However, a goodly share of spatial rendition is dependent on the room and the positions of the listener and speakers, so I tend to be skeptical of spatial impressions reported in reviews including mine. So should you. No matter, my evaluation was conducted with the CS1. Thiel recommends a minimum listening distance of 8 feet. The owner's manual suggests "straight-ahead" speaker aiming. I tried that and "cross-fire" toedin aiming. For the most part, cross-fire aiming tended to improve perceived spaciousness, tighten image precision, and make the thin bass sound fuller. Of course, much of this is undoubtedly associated with the acoustics of my listening room. Your mileage may vary. Using the adjustable feet, I tilted the speaker carefully to aim it at my ears. Even though the baffle slopes back a bit more than 10, the tweeter axis was still somewhat below the plane of my ears at a foot listening distance without this adjustment. Spectrally, the system had very good clarity and detail but sounded a little thin and soft in the bass; that's often the case with 6. For example, on Oscar Peterson's "You Look Good To Me," the piano, soft percussive details, and bassist Ray Brown's low-level mutterings were clearly rendered and had natural timbre, but Brown's acoustic bass was somewhat subdued. Likewise on Carla Bley's "Copyright Royalties," the smallest details of brushes, brass, and clarinet sounds were clearly identifiable. Although the CS1. The Thiels seldom managed to convince me the sound was not coming directly from the speakers. When I moved off-axis, the center image followed me; all 2-channel speaker systems are somewhat subject to this effect, but not always to this extent. On recordings with loud bass, the CS1. For example, the strong bass line on Roy Orbison's "Dream You" just disappeared at high levels, and the percussion on The Sheffield Track Record and Joe Farrell's kick drum in "Upon This Rock" went 'pop, pop' instead of delivering a solid whack to the sternum. Similarly, when turned up to high levels, Heart's "Magic Man" tended to shriek. The pair of Thiels did, however, sound clean, with no obvious distortion and only modest spectral shift at levels up to 99 dB SPL at a foot listening distance in a large room. On material with very low frequency content Bass Connection's "Drivin' Bass" , overload would occur at 80 dB SPL, but with remarkably little noise from the port. These dynamic limitations are of limited importance for jazz, soft rock, middle-of-the-road music, and all but the most challenging classical material but I wouldn't recommend the CS1. The Thiel CS1. Adding a subwoofer will generally make the system useful with a wider range of more dynamic programming, but it will never be suitable for head-banging. Home theater? By themselves, the Thiels lack the loudness and bass for that, unless you add a subwooferand as long as you're doing that, you might want smaller speakers anyway. And somehow, I can't see their styling fitting gracefully into a multichannel system. What should we expect from a twoway speaker in the CS1. Excellent cosmetics? Thiel nails it; great finish, state of the art grille. Excellent spectral presentation? Right on, Thiel. A design philosophy and interesting tech story that will keep owners loving these speakers through the years? That's here in spades. State-of-the-art dynamics? Nonot with a 6. In all, the CS1. That's about all you can expect from any small-woofer system. Yes, there are systems that work nearly as well for a lot less money. But, I can't think of any that have nearly this nice a finish. Ohm Acoustics Corp. OhmSpeakers aol. Editor's Note: The origin of the unique Walsh driver appears to have been forgotten, or at least allowed to lapse into some kind of vague folklore, over years; the following is the "official" version, which I can confidently tellbecause I was there. Ohm Acoustics was founded in by Martin Gersten, a self-taught loudspeaker designer, for no other reason than to become employed again after he had lost his job at Rectilinear a speaker company that went out of business many years ago. Gersten had several silent partners with a financial interest in the new company; I was one of them. I was still in the advertising business at the time; three years later I sold all of my stock back to the company, so for the past 29 years I've had nothing to do with Ohm-just to reassure the three or four aging conspiracy theorists who still haven't given up trying to catch me in a conflict of interest. At first the company made only conventional "monkey coffins" as rectangular box speakers were condescendingly called in those days , but soon Lincoln Walsh, whom Gersten had known for some time, entered into negotiation with Ohm to have his patented loudspeaker invention developed, manufactured, and marketed. I would never have become involved with Ohmwhose name was actually my suggestionif I hadn't known that the Walsh speaker was coming Lincoln Walsh was a veteran engineer, a member of the team that had developed radar during World War II and the designer of the legendary Brook triode am-. His loudspeaker invention was based on a simple insight: No speaker cone is actually a piston, in the sense that its perimeter moves the same instant as its apex is set in motion by the voice coil. It takes a finite amount of time for an impulse to travel from the apex to the perimeter. A good woofer cone appears to be a piston only because the wavelengths it reproduces are so large that the transmission time from apex to perimeter represents only a tiny fraction of the wavelength and does not result in a perceptible ripple or breakup. Sexy hot long legs. Clit piecing video. Home toy teens fuck. Porn body painting girl. Sex Dating. 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The LED level Tsakiridis amplifiers suck on my power amplifier showed that the amp was Tsakiridis amplifiers suck noticeably less hard when driving the SM s. The SM s performed admirably on recordings with high peak content, which profit from high playback levelsbig-band material with prominent brass sections and drum rim shots, for example.

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However, when I got carried away with the volume control on some of the Telarc CD's very loud low-bass passages, I Tsakiridis amplifiers suck overload the s severely.

The s' bass response was quite adequate on most of the material I listened to. On shaped tone bursts, bass response was quite acceptable down to 50 Hz, with usable output at 40 Hzbut not at lower frequencies. Teaming the s up with a subwoofer improved the sound significantly, putting the s on a more equal footing with the much larger s.

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On well-recorded female vocals, the s did read article some slight uppermidrange irregularities, but on highfrequency sibilants they did quite well, reproducing them without harshness, strain, or spittiness.

After my lab tests revealed high-frequency response aberrations caused by the tweeter resonance mentioned earlier, I listened to the speakers again, but could hear no problems caused by this. Although my hearing, at this point, is rolled off in the range of this resonance, I sometimes can detect the subharmonics of such resonances.

The s were the full equal of the s on male speaking voices. With the speakers turned upside down, the sound heard from a standing position matched the on-axis sound more closely.

Differences were much less evident with music than with pink noise. The imaging and soundstaging of the s were excellent. Mono center images were quite stable and did not shift when the recording's frequency content changed. The s did extremely well on classical a cappella choral music, reproducing the voices and the room's reverberant sound with great precision.

Considering their reasonable price, good looks, and great sound, I highly recommend the Tsakiridis amplifiers suck Technology StudioMonitor speakers Tsakiridis amplifiers suck stereo use or for a home theater setup. Tsakiridis amplifiers suck

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With Tsakiridis amplifiers suck competent subwoofer, they provide real competition for many much larger systems. Their high sensitivity and smooth response will be welcome in any music system. Don Keele.

Genelec Inc. Tested samples on loan from manufacturer. No audio component is perfect, and speakers are the least perfect of all. The imperfections of other components can be too small for anyone Tsakiridis amplifiers suck hear, but speakersall of themhave readily audible deficiencies. The virtue of "active," or powered, speakers is that their electronics Tsakiridis amplifiers suck make those defects far less audible: Dedicated electronic equalizers can minimize the speaker's frequency-response errors.

Built-in amplifiers can provide the exact power that the speaker or, better yet, each driver requires and, if each driver is powered separately, precise active crossovers can be employed instead of cruder, passive ones.

What's more, protective circuitry can be custom-tailored to the drivers it safeguards. Despite their obvious potential for. Why buy power again? The complexity of modern audio and Tsakiridis amplifiers suck theater systems may change that. In the days of stereo, all you needed was a record player, a tuner, a tape deck, a preamplifier, and a stereo power amplifier, plus five Tsakiridis amplifiers suck to hold everything.

Today, you might have seven source components, a preamplifier, satellite receiver, and an equalizer well, I do. Who has rack space for an additional seven or eight channels' worth of amplifiers?

I sure don't. Just click for source I use active speakers throughout Tsakiridis amplifiers suck 7.

Genelec is a fairly new name in the consumer market, but this Finnish company's active speakers are highly regarded and widely used in pro sound, where active speakers have long been common. Now, the company is angling for consumer sales, with several series of active home-theater speakers. The HT is the larger two-way speaker system in the Intimate Home Theater series there's also a three-way systemrecommended for rooms of 3, to 4, cubic feet; other series are designed for rooms of under 3, 5, to 10, and over 10, cubic feet.

The line also includes an in-wall model and two subwoofers. The HT has a inch woofer, which is unusual in a two-way speaker. The primary reason you don't see. Passive crossovers can have little or no influence on directivity, especially while retaining smooth response off axis. Better-performing satellites use 6- or 6-inch woofers at most, because such drivers are the largest ones capable of offering both a reasonable low-frequency Tsakiridis amplifiers suck and a woofer directivity that closely matches the tweeter's near the crossover 1.

With electronic crossovers the designer can play a few little trade-off games regarding directivity; in the case of the HT, however, the excellent directivity over the entire operating Tsakiridis amplifiers suck from 42 Hz to 22 kHz, despite the comparatively large woofer, appears to be due to the shallow, hornlike "Directivity Control Waveguide" surrounding the tweeter. The HT has two internal amplifiers: Genelec doesn't say what Tsakiridis amplifiers suck hell "short-term" watts are, but who cares?

Amplifier power ratings for active speakers powered subwoofers included have no signif. We need to know how much energy comes out of the speaker, not how much energy goes in to produce that output. Of course, Tsakiridis amplifiers suck manufacturer X gets dB SPL with a 2,watt amplifier and manufacturer Y does it with 20 watts, I might prefer the latter because it's easier on my electric bill. An "Autostart" function turns the unit off if no signal has been present for 5 minutes, but restarts it immediately when a new signal is received.

Additional controls on the rear panel wouldn't remote controls be cool? Units currently in production have two additional features: Users will be able to select whether the LEDs remain off, show only yellow for standby and green for operation, or also show Tsakiridis amplifiers suck for overload. The speaker is magnetically shielded, so you can use it near a TV set or other cathode-ray tube CRT display. The HT is relatively large for a satellite speaker.

With its bass response specified as Although it has a small, 1-foot-square footprint, the cabinet occupies 2. However, HTs are now available in glossy piano black and three wood-veneer finishes, all complete with grilles prices not established at press time. As I did not have the grilles, I could. The tweeter waveguide plate can be removed and rotated 90 so the Genelec logo will be Tsakiridis amplifiers suck if you mount the speaker horizontally.

The electronics panel on the rear is resiliently mounted, a pro-sound carryover that protects the system against rough handling on Tsakiridis amplifiers suck. The enclosure seems relatively tourproof, too: How did the Genelec HT measure up? Let's discuss how it performed in the lab first. Basic measurements were taken at 2 meters in my large, 7,cubic-foot, room; maximum output for a stereo-arrayed pair was measured at 4 meters in the same room. The horizontal response graph Fig. Directly on axis, its response fits in a 3 Tsakiridis amplifiers suck window from 55 Hz to 20 kHz, shelved up by approximately 2 dB between 1 and 10 Mature male pics. Horizontal directivity is remarkably smooth and wide.

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This is not due to some kind of electronic trickery; there is no suggestion to Tsakiridis amplifiers suck effect in Genelec's specs and literature. As it is most unusual for a inch two-way system to work this well off axis, the explanation probably lies, as I suggested earlier, in the shallow, hornlike baffle "Directivity Control Waveguide" of the tweeter. Vertical radiation patterns Tsakiridis amplifiers suck. Below the axis, there's a sharp, deep notch at 1.

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Above-axis response is smooth to about 20, with notching near the crossover frequency as the angle increases. These problems are common when multiway speakers have drivers placed side by side or when vertically arrayed systems are used horizontally. I beg people with multiple listening seats to visit web page a vertically arrayed center channel.

The HT should be used vertically whenever possible, and when used for a center channel should preferably be placed below the screen. For example, the Tsakiridis amplifiers suck switch for Bass Roll-Off a highpass filter whose slope increases from 6 to 12 dB per octave in small steps indicates cuts of 2, 4, 6, and 8 dB for frequencies below Hz, but setting the switch at -8 dB only cut response by only a little more than 5 dB.

Likewise, the Bass Tilt switch which should Tsakiridis amplifiers suck 2, 4, or 6 dB below 1 kHz, depending upon its setting produced a Tsakiridis amplifiers suck dB reduction when set in the -6 dB position. The tweeter and woofer can be turned off individually when the Mute position on Tsakiridis amplifiers suck driver's DIP switch is selectedwhile this is a fantastic feature for nearfield measuring it is of no use I can think Tsakiridis amplifiers suck for home listening.

For a two-way satellite, the HT delivered a healthy output, though not quite as healthy as suggested by Genelec's specification dB peak per pair at 1 meter, with music. The HT's low-frequency abilities were similar to those of many "fullrange" floor-standing loudspeakers I've used. Speakers seldom have the lowfrequency dynamic capability that reference measurement levels imply.

Frequently, full-range models whose measured low-frequency extension seems impressive exhibit an "Tsakiridis amplifiers suck" spectral balance shift at high output. To measure the Genelec's low-frequency abilities, I used a technique adopted from Don Keele: I fed the speaker ramped, 6. This is because the speaker is just leaving its linear output range at that point; as the level increases further, distortion will begin increasing exponentially. Surprisingly few two-way satellites or even full-range speakers can deliver such usable output at 40 Hz.

However, the HT's usable output at 40 Hz was nearly 25 dB below its maximum clean output at higher frequencies, which occasionally caused the spectral Tsakiridis amplifiers suck shift described previously. If you want full-bandwidth dynamic capability, you'll need to use the Genelec with a subwoofer.

I listened to the HT as a stereo pair. The sound was clean and clear, although somewhat aggressive. With the Treble Tilt switch set to 0 dB, there was excessive sibilance when playing Suzanne Vega's recording of "Tom's Diner" on Solitude Standing and percussion sounded somewhat Tsakiridis amplifiers suck. When I set the Treble Tilt switch to -4 dB, however, voices and acoustic instruments were rendered with natural timbre and excellent detail and clarity, although the speaker still sounded slightly aggressive.

The Genelecs delivered a wide, moderately deep soundstage, with excellent image placement and separation. Dynamically, the H T Tsakiridis amplifiers suck 1 0 plays damn loud, yet retains its clarity when the music gets soft or is simply played softly.

There is some, but less than usual, upward spectral shift when playing full-range recordings at very loud levels. When played at full gain with ultraloud, dynamic, or ultracompressed program material Radiohead's Amnesiac, Fugees' Blunted on Reality, Jay Leonhart's Salamander Pie the H T 2 1 0 could play roughly 3 dB beyond its clean limit. At such high levels, Christian teens nude pics Genelec's limiters keep turning on and off and the sound is sometimes grossly distorted.

I used hearing protection when checking this. But when you're finished abusing the speaker, there will be no burned or bottomed voice coils, and the system will play as if it were still new. The Genelec HT will reward any listener with high-quality, highoutput playback in mono, stereo, and multichannel music and film systems. It has more output capability than any other two-way home system I've ever used, and more than many inch towers.

As a satellite speaker, it's a little on the large side. As a full-range speaker, it's moderate in size but with the impact of many larger floor-standing systems. Like all satellite and most full-range systems it will benefit from a subwoofer if you like high-impact low-frequency programs.

As far here I'm concerned, these Genelecs would be welcome in my house anytime. Tom Nousaine. Model CS1. The Tsakiridis amplifiers suck. That look is part of Thiel's Tsakiridis amplifiers suck Source" design, which, the company says, aims to Tsakiridis amplifiers suck "time and phase distortions that cause alterations in the reproduced musical waveforms of most loudspeakers.

The front panel is claimed to reduce parasitic resonances, and its rounded corners minimize diffraction. Thiel also uses widebandwidth drivers and true, first-order crossovers to maintain phase coherence. The result, says Thiel, is enhanced realism, clarity, transparency and immediacy, as well as improved imaging and a deeper soundstage. The woofer's construction is unusual. Instead of placing a small voice coil at the apex of a deep woofer cone, Thiel gave the CS1.

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This design distributes the driving force over a larger area and, by reducing the unsupported span between the coil and the cone's edge, re. According to Thiel, it also moves Tsakiridis amplifiers suck diaphragm's spurious resonances to a much higher frequency, and hence raises the driver's high-frequency cutoff.

As a result of this driving system, the woofer's cone is quite shallow and its dustcap is distinctively large. The large voice coil enables Thiel to place the neodymium magnet inside the pole piece rather than outside it. This topology provides magnetic shielding; when I set a CS1.

The woofer's extended response is a necessity, because of the CS1. The virtues claimed for first-order crossovers, which have gentle slopes of 6 dB per octave, are simple construction typically, one capacitor and one inductor and "phase coherence" the elimination of phase changes at the crossover frequency.

The theory is that a first-order crossover keeps the two drivers in quadrature 90 apart at all frequencies, and consequently the sum of the two drivers' acoustic outputs is theoretically a perfect replica of the crossover's input. The importance of this from the standpoint of audibility has long been debated and belongs in another discussion. Continue reading also necessary to have loudspeaker drivers that operate cleanly for two to three octaves beyond the crossover point.

This is because moving-coil drivers are second-order devices, which roll off at 12 dB per octave outside their natural passband. Only very wideband drivers allow the system's roll-off to start well before the drivers'.

A firstorder crossover's gentle slope also does little to suppress any irregularities in the driver's response outside its passband. So using such drivers not only requires an extended upper range for the woofer, but also Tsakiridis amplifiers suck downward ex. Thiel says quite a bit about technologies that extend the response of the CSl.

Nonetheless, I neither heard nor measured any of the anomalies I'd expect if the tweeter lacked low-end response or had insufficient power handling at low frequencies. Despite the appealing simplicity of basic first-order filter design, it often. Thiel's literature says that the company's speakers "make extensive use of network compensation. The recess flares outward rapidly to a width of 4 inches at the panel's front surface.

Thiel says this design reduces unwanted port noise, and my experience with the speaker backs that up. According to the company, the port design also reduces "grille loading effects," andhallelujah! However, that may have more. Magnets hidden beneath the cabinet surface hold the grille to the front baffle, eliminating grille frames and other constructions that could affect response. That baffle, by the way, is Tsakiridis amplifiers suck inches thick, and the other enclosure panels are an inch thick, stiffening the cabinet and minimizing secondary radiation.

The cabinet is not only stiff but beautifully finished, something Thiel is known for. Buyers have their choice of 15 fine cabinet finishes, at several price levels. At the other end of the scale, a pair of CS1. Custom finishes are also available. Connections are made via heavyduty multiway binding posts on the rear panel. Tsakiridis amplifiers suck are not on -inch centers, so they won't accept double banana plugs, but single banana plugs work fine.

By the way, you can easily convert a dual banana plug into a pair of singles with diagonal cutters. There is Tsakiridis amplifiers suck one pair of connecting posts per speaker, because Thiel doesn't believe biamping or biwiring are necessary neither do I. But the company Tsakiridis amplifiers suck says that it does not use separate woofer and tweeter connections. Tsakiridis amplifiers suck

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Warranty is 10 years to the Tsakiridis amplifiers suck owners for any defects in material and workmanship. My basic measurements of die Thiel CS1. I also supplemented the quasianechoic measurements with 2-meter readings taken with the speaker standing on a carpeted floor to replicate normal use. In my Tsakiridis amplifiers suck, click at this page of performance on a floor should always be used when designing and evaluating a tower speaker, because its proximity to the floor will affect its response in any listening room.

Floors also affect the response of stand- or shelfmounted speakers, but the effects will vary with the height at which the speaker is mounted. The characteristic on-axis response of the CS1. At higher frequencies, response slopes gently downward at approximately 3 dB per octave. Off-axis response Tsakiridis amplifiers suck the horizontal plane Fig.

Vertically, response deteriorates rapidly above axis Fig. Radiation below the axis Fig. On the other hand, the clever grille has virtually zero effect on the response. Sensitivity is 90 dB SPL at 1 Tsakiridis amplifiers suck with 2. From Hz up, its impedance is 4 ohms or less, reaching its minimum 3. I use a ramped 6. At this point, the speaker still sounds Tsakiridis amplifiers suck, but distortion begins increasing exponentially with further increases in level.

While the CS1. Two-channel listening may be officially dead in this home-theater era, but I listened to the CS1. Even stereo can mask some operating deficiencies, and Floyd Toole makes a good case for using a single speaker system for listening evaluations.

Tsakiridis amplifiers suck

Spectral balance and dynamics can surely be tested in this Tsakiridis amplifiers suck. Certain spatial characteristics, such as openness the ability to make sound seem independent of its actual source and reproduction of ambience, can also be fairly evaluated with Tsakiridis amplifiers suck single channel.

However, a goodly share of spatial rendition is dependent on the room and the positions of the listener and speakers, so I tend to be skeptical of spatial impressions reported in reviews including mine. So should you. No matter, my evaluation was conducted with Tsakiridis amplifiers suck CS1.

Thiel recommends a minimum listening distance of 8 feet. The article source manual suggests "straight-ahead" speaker aiming. I tried that and "cross-fire" toedin aiming.

Fitness Pornolari Watch Xxx fuck compilation college girls Video Sexdate tiel. Auto manufacturers lag far behind the amateurs in terms of performance, price, and practicality see "Big Automakers vs. Backyard Mechanics," page , probably because the manufacturers don't believe a viable market for electric cars exists. Wayland's tricked-out Datsun will have 1, watts of audio. Toyota and General Motors have made the most serious investments, but Toyota spokesperson Jeremy Barnes freely admits that "we're not expecting to make a profit from EVs. We're working on getting the cost curve down. This is a bizarre situation. Amateurs are building affordable electrics, while huge corporations seem unwilling or unable to do so. The reason is simple: Manufacturers are obsessed with maximizing the distance an EV can travel between recharges. According to Toyota's Barnes, "Our market research shows that the greatest concern of potential customers is range. The first thing anyone asks is usually, "How often do you need to plug it in? Batteries are the problem. Two gallons of gasoline weigh about 18 pounds and will take you 60 miles in a typical economy car, but you need pounds of the most modern lead-acid batteries to achieve the same result. That's a to-1 weight-ratio penalty. Auto companies have used extreme measures to address this issue. GM's EV1 uses exotic composite materials and even titanium components to reduce weight. Its special tires minimize rolling resistance. Its AC motor is fractionally more efficient than the cheap DC units favored by amateurs, and its regenerative braking recharges the batteries when you slow down. These state-of-the-art options add a huge amount to the cost of the car, while increasing its range only to an average of 80 miles between recharges. Toyota has followed a path that seems more practical at first glance yet still results in a vehicle that's too expensive to be profitable. Instead of spending millions perfecting an ultraefficient car, engineers simply put an electric motor into a preexisting sport-utility vehicle, the RAV4. But to overcome its high weight and wind resistance they installed nickel metal hydride NiMH batteries, which are insanely expensive. In other words, they're selling the batteries at a loss. If that seems a bit extreme, consider this: Toyota has also developed a futuristic five-seater named the Prius, which contains a 1. This hybrid design, scheduled to be marketed in the United States in , is claimed by the manufacturer to generate one-tenth the emissions while getting double the gas mileage. The electric motor contributes power for acceleration, while the gasoline engine recharges the batteries when the car cruises. This increases the claimed range to more than miles - but the dual system adds cost, complexity, battery weight, and potential maintenance problems. No one believes it can be sold at a profit. Overall, despite heroic efforts and a money-is-no-object attitude, manufacturers of pure EVs are still hampered by range limitations. So why not do what the amateurs have done: Admit that EVs are unsuitable for long distances, and design them within that limitation. After all, if you're contemplating a cross-country trip, it doesn't matter whether the range is 40, 80, or miles; you're not going to use an electric vehicle. For routine chores, electrics make sense. As Bob Boyd points out, in most two-car families, one car is used mainly for grocery shopping, commuting, or taking the kids to school, and a local range is probably adequate. The backyard builders have acknowledged this. As a result, their electrics need fewer batteries and are lighter, faster, more roomy, better-handling, and much, much cheaper. John Wayland would like to see auto manufacturers offer something like a Dodge Neon fitted with the same simple type of DC motor and battery pack that the amateurs have been using. People would buy it because it has no pollution, no vibration, better acceleration, less maintenance, and you don't have to go to the gas station. You know, people always say, 'Isn't it inconvenient to have to plug in your car? Recharging is still an issue, because most EVs require a volt power supply, which isn't easily available when you're on the road, and you have to wait an average of three hours to replenish totally dead batteries. In the future, however, this might change. A new generation of EVs could use volts, which would enable much faster charging. In most areas of America, voltage is stepped down to or for domestic use via transformers on utility poles. But the power lines on those poles typically carry about 12, volts. Therefore, volt outlets could be installed quite cheaply in gas stations, rest areas, motels, and truck stops. If you could recharge your car in 20 minutes - in the time it takes to eat a hamburger - EVs would begin to seem usable not just for local trips, but for long distance travel. This is a far-fetched fantasy. Back here in reality, manufacturers have made their EVs so expensive to build, they seem to be trying to sell as few as possible. GM takes the prize in this respect by offering the EV1 only on a closed-end three-year lease to customers who satisfy onerous demographic criteria. Only EV1s are on the road so far. When pressed to explain how the corporation will continue developing a car that defies commercial common sense, Jim Evans responds vaguely: It's really too early to determine whether electric or hybrid vehicles are going to play out. The amateurs, meanwhile, are out there pushing the limits of EVs in their own gung-ho fashion. Meanwhile Roderick Wilde is planning the most extreme project yet: That would be 1 megawatt, approximately equivalent to 1, net horsepower. The car will contain at least four motors, and Wilde claims that by the time you read this, a solid-state controller will be perfected to handle all that current. It'll be the fastest street-legal electric car. But a 1,horsepower electric car generates no emissions. It can be legal. Of course they'll find some way to outlaw it sooner or later, because it's too potentially dangerous. I mean, even my Mazda is already insane on the street - if you nail it, you end up going sideways. John Wayland is cruising in a different direction. His next project is a tricked-out '66 Datsun minitruck with an electric motor mounted at the rear, leaving the front engine compartment empty. I'll have 1, watts of audio, from twin amplifiers powered by twin baby Optima batteries, recharged by twin DC-DC converters from the high-voltage battery stack located in the rear under a remote-controlled electric tilt bed. The paint job will be grape-jelly purple, with inch wheels and LED sequential-flashing turn signals. I'm going to call it Purple Phaze. Outside his brick-and-lap-siding home, Wayland surveys his two electric cars, three electric pickup trucks, and one electric lawn tractor parked along his driveway and inside his garage - where shelves are packed with spare batteries, and racing trophies form a glittering shrine beside a toolbox and a drill press. All of the vehicles are immaculately clean and meticulously engineered. All are silent, economical, and nonpolluting. And all except for the lawn tractor and a red pickup built more for range than speed give you that kick in the ass when you press the pedal to the metal. He's been reciting this mantra for almost 20 years. But as other car builders become infected with his obsession, consumers just might begin to reconsider their obsession with range and start demanding electric cars that make sense. Big Automakers vs. Backyard Mechanics More Juice. View Comments. Sponsored Content Powered By Outbrain. More Stories. Photo Gallery. Shannon Stirone Shannon Stirone. Your "Hip Boots" column is sorely missed because it keeps the crazy audio drivel in check. Don't give that up! Tom Nousaine's "Urban Audio Legends". You never knew that light could be measured in dB? Well, it seems there are lots of things you never knew, and this is one of them. A dB number can be just an expression of a ratio, e. Thus 3 dB too much red means 1. Your assumption that it's Floyd Toole, Ph. Now, about Issue No. When there are three or more of anything, one will be the best, one will be the least good, and the other s will be in between. That doesn't mean, however, that they aren't all good. Didn't it occur to you that it just might be more complicated than that? Thanks for all your concerns. I was truly delighted to find Issue No. It is so good to see that someone is still out there battling the fakes and frauds. Peter, you are my hero. See below. In your editorial you claim to be getting old and tired. But cheer up. What you are doing with The Audio Critic is such excellent work that it must go on. I have retired from the audio field after many years and am now, 10 years into. These are gardening, astronomy, and mineral collecting. Still, I think about audio matters very often and still do a bit of consulting in room acoustics and audio systems. I have taken the liberty of sending you a couple of photos of my listening room as it is now and has been for 22 years. I am still pleased with it and find no reason to change anything. It is now the music that counts for me. Very best regards and best wishes for future success. Greiner is Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, and one of my heroes, as our regular readers know. For quite a few decades before his retirement he embodied the academic community's most authoritative, and at the same time most genial, voice on the subject of audio. Talk about "battling the fakes and frauds"he was at all times in the font lines, patiently refuting charlatanry with irrefutable science. My admiration for him is unlimited, hence his frequent presence in this column. We may not have anything near the circulation of Stereophile, but could they ever, in a million years, have elicited a letter like the above from Dick Greiner? As for your music system and listening room, Dick, should I be surprised that you are not looking for a change? What, only eight monstrous woofers? Only 24 visible smaller drivers? Only a dozen electronic units? I have never seen a setup like yours, and very, very few 21st century rigs like it. It really amuses me when you say that only the music matters; it's like a Rolls Royce owner saying that, well, it's basic transportation. May you listen to that music in good health and spirits for many years to comeand thank you for your compliments. Hello Peter, I have come to praise you, not to bury you! Item One: I received the latest issue of The Audio Critic No. Your explanation as to the reason for the disintegration of your relationship with The CM Group caught my attention. Greg had not read your explanation as to what happened between you and The CM Group, so I read your explanation to him verbatim. Was I surprised at his response! He agreed with you completely! To be completely honest which is a much better form of honesty than partially honest! There wasn't. Not only did he agree with your explanation but spoke very highly of you! Son of a gun! It's somewhat humbling to admit I was wrong, but it would be a mortal sin not to admit so and apologize. Item Two: No need to tell you that I couldn't wait to read Mr. Wolverton's article. Fortunately, this time, the cultists were shown as believing? Much to my pleasant surprise, you and David Rich were quoted regarding the continued on page Our Last Column How come? By Ivan Berger, Guest D. Strauss, Contributing. Tested samples on loan from the manufacturer. A inch, side-mounted woofer in a full-range speaker this small? Not quite. It's something Definitive Technologies calls a "planar-technology pressure-driven subwoofer"in other words, a passive radiator sometimes called a PR, drone cone, auxiliary bass radiator, or flapping baffle. Typically, passive radiators substitute for vents, or ports, in small speakers designed to deliver substantial bass output. That's a good description of the StudioMonitor , a member of Definitive Technologies' "Monitor Series" of modestly priced home-theater loudspeakers. Using a ported cabinet instead of. It does this by coupling an acoustic resonant system the enclosure and a portusually a tubethat vents its output into the room to the rear of the speaker's diaphragm. This sets up an acoustic resonance between the mass of air moving in the port and the stiffness of the air in the enclosure. By matching the enclosure and port sizes to the characteristics of the driver, this resonator is typically tuned to a frequency near the lowest frequency the system is intended to reproduce, and radiates low frequencies over a range of roughly two-thirds of an octave around its resonance. If the system is properly designed, far more sound comes from the port within its operating range than from the driver. Because the ported enclosure's acoustic resonant system is typically more linear than the mechanical resonant system of the speaker, its distortion is lower. Below its resonance, unfortunately, the port's output is essentially out of phase with the loudspeaker's, which makes the system's bass output roll off much faster than that of an equivalent closed-box system. There is, however, a catch to all this: At high volume levels, the air in the vent can move fast enough to generate significant turbulence, which causes extraneous noise and limits the port's output. This turbulence can be tamed by increasing the port's area, but that calls for lengthening the port to increase the air mass within it. Otherwise, the box resonance, and hence the shape of the speaker's response curve, will change. For small boxes that are tuned to low frequencies and designed to radiate a lot of acoustic power, enlarging the port's mouth would call for very long port tubes that take up a lot of space in the box; sometimes, tubes that are long enough won't fit! Using a passive radiator sidesteps these problems. Typically, a passive radiator is a speaker frame, cone, surround, and sometimes spider without a magnet and voice coil. Here, the ported-box resonance is a function of the mass of the passive radiator and the compliance of the air trapped in the enclosure. Because it is shallow, the radiator can be made large enough to avoid turbulence while taking up hardly any space within the cabinet. And because the radiator's mass is in-. A properly designed passive radiator requires roughly two to four times the air-moving capability 1. Both active drivers are mounted on the front of the cabinet, with the tweeter on top and offset about an inch to one side. The speakers are provided in mirrorimage pairs, with black, white, or golden-cherry piano-gloss finishes on the top and bottom. The front, sides, and rear are covered in a wrap-around grille cloth, held in place by the removable top and bottom pieces. Connection is through a single pair of gold-plated multiway binding posts, spaced for double banana plugs, on the bottom rear of the cabinet. Cabinet construction is quite heavy-duty for a speaker system of this size and price: The cabinet is well braced and quite solid. The magnetically shielded, 1-inch aluminum-dome tweeter is essentially the same as that used in Definitive Technology's top-of-the-line systems. The inch passive radiator is simply a rigid circular plate with an attached surround. The SM 's crossover is wired on a small PC board mounted near the speaker's input cup and can be reached by removing the cup. The crossover, a second-order design, has an iron-. That's one more resistor and capacitor than usual; the extra components probably act as an impedance-compensating network. As in my previous reviews, I used two different test techniques to measure frequency responses. The test signal for these measurements was the usual 2. The on-axis response of the Studio Monitor is shown in Fig. Only the response with the grille on is shown, because the grille cloth is not designed to be removed; fortunately, the grille had essentially no effect on the SM 's response except for very small deviations of less than 0. The smoothed curve is quite well behaved and fits a tight 2. At higher frequencies, the unsmoothed curve exhibits a sharp dip of about 10 dB at At low frequencies, the system rolls off slowly, reaching -3 dB at 83 Hz, - 6 dB at 63 Hz, and - 9 dB at about 50 Hz which is near the SM 's vented-box resonance. Below 50 Hz, the system rolls off rapidly, about 24 dB per octave, as is common with vented-box systems. However, this curve was measured in free space,. The SM 's horizontal and vertical off-axis frequency responses are shown in Fig. Between 1 and 3 kHz the response shelves downward, the dip worsening as the offaxis angle is increased. There are also significant high-frequency aberrations above 8 kHz at extreme off-axis angles. These aberrations include a dip above 10 kHz, followed by a peak at about 13 kHz. That high-frequency dip and peak are also seen in the responses measured above and below the tweeter's axis. The above-axis curves Fig. Response below axis Fig. Between 3. This implies that these speakers should be aimed above ear level, or possibly be mounted upside down to provide the smoothest response for seated or standing listeners. Luckily, the cabinet bottoms are finished like the tops, although there are four small bumps that serve as feet. Unfortunately, the logos on front of the speakers are upside down when the speakers are inverted. The input impedance magnitude of the StudioMonitor Fig. The two impedance peaks that mark the as a vented box are clearly evident; the impedance minimum 3. The impedance phase Fig. The SM should be an easy load for any competent power amplifier or hometheater receiver. To measure the distortion of the Figs. In this setup, test signals generated by Igor are fed through the USBPre and my amplifier to the s, while signals from my test microphone are fed to the computer through the USBPre, then analyzed and plotted on graphs by Igor. The distortion was evaluated at each frequency by applying a sine wave to the system for one half second and then evaluating the harmonic distortion of the system's output, measuring the total energy of the 2nd through 5th harmonics by using FFT Fast Fourier Transform to compute the frequency spectrum of that output. Results are expressed as a percentage of the fundamental's signal level, not as a percentage of the total output. The harmonic distortion at each frequency was evaluated at three different power levels, 6 dB apart. At the power levels I used for this test, the distortion did not become irritating until the test frequency dropped below 45 Hz. The SM woofer's intermodulation distortion IM was measured with the same power levels and test conditions as in the harmonic distortion test but over a slightly different range of frequencies. For this test, I applied two tones of equal level, one fixed at Hz, the other varying from The dual-tone test signals were applied to the speaker for one half second each. The test results, expressed as a percentage of the energy of the two original test tones, represent the total energy of three intermodulation sidebands above and three below the higher test frequency. The IM Fig. For frequencies above Hz, the harmonic distortion percentage stays roughly constant and generally doubles when the input power does. Below Hz, the distortion reaches a maximum at about 70 Hz, falls to a. The dip in the vicinity of 50 Hz coincides with the system's ventedbox tuning frequency, where the passive radiator is producing most of the sound. As you can see from the slight shift in this dip when the power level changes, box tuning varies slightly with the test conditions; this is why the impedance measurement, above, indicates 55 Hz as the tuning frequency. At the highest power level, 25 watts, the maximum distortion is a. When I first unpacked the StudioMonitor s, I was quite impressed with their overall appearance, especially the cabinets' piano-black top and bottom panels. At first, I could not figure out how to get the grille cloth off so I could see the drivers, but I soon determined that the top and bottom panels could be removed, as they are attached to the cabinet with four pegs that engage holes in the panels. When a panel is removed, it uncovers the grille cloth, which is tightened around the cabinet with a captive drawstring. The grille wraps completely around the cabinet and has a cutout at the rear for the input-terminal cup. When uncovered, the speakers and cabinet had a meticulous, no-nonsense look that showed careful craftsmanship and attention to detail. Under the grille cloth, the enclosure was finished in an attractive satin black. The SM s are provided with wallmounting brackets that screw into routed-out holes on the rear panel a nice touch. The large passive radiator essentially takes up one whole side of the cabinet; in an enclosure this size, it looks like a monster woofer. The radiator is inset " to protect it from damage. When energized by highlevel sine waves, the speaker sounded quite clean down to 40 Hz, but distortion was audibly significant at lower frequencies. At the box tuning frequency, the woofer's motion almost ceased and the passive radiator's excursion became quite large. The deep null in the woofer's excursion showed that the box and the passive radiator work extremely well. At and near the system's tuning frequency, maximum clean excursion was about 0. The effective radiating diameter of the passive radiator is about 8. This makes the drone cone's radiating area approximately 2. As I said above, this is good design practice for a passive-radiator system. For my listening, I placed the systems on 24" stands which raised the tweeter to about 34" above the floor about 7 feet apart and well away from room's side walls. The LED level monitors on my power amplifier showed that the amp was working noticeably less hard when driving the SM s. The SM s performed admirably on recordings with high peak content, which profit from high playback levelsbig-band material with prominent brass sections and drum rim shots, for example. With the peakexercising special effects on Ein Straussfest Telarc CDone of my favorites, even though it dates back to ! However, when I got carried away with the volume control on some of the Telarc CD's very loud low-bass passages, I could overload the s severely. The s' bass response was quite adequate on most of the material I listened to. On shaped tone bursts, bass response was quite acceptable down to 50 Hz, with usable output at 40 Hzbut not at lower frequencies. Teaming the s up with a subwoofer improved the sound significantly, putting the s on a more equal footing with the much larger s. On well-recorded female vocals, the s did exhibit some slight uppermidrange irregularities, but on highfrequency sibilants they did quite well, reproducing them without harshness, strain, or spittiness. After my lab tests revealed high-frequency response aberrations caused by the tweeter resonance mentioned earlier, I listened to the speakers again, but could hear no problems caused by this. Although my hearing, at this point, is rolled off in the range of this resonance, I sometimes can detect the subharmonics of such resonances. The s were the full equal of the s on male speaking voices. With the speakers turned upside down, the sound heard from a standing position matched the on-axis sound more closely. Differences were much less evident with music than with pink noise. The imaging and soundstaging of the s were excellent. Mono center images were quite stable and did not shift when the recording's frequency content changed. The s did extremely well on classical a cappella choral music, reproducing the voices and the room's reverberant sound with great precision. Considering their reasonable price, good looks, and great sound, I highly recommend the Definitive Technology StudioMonitor speakers for stereo use or for a home theater setup. With a competent subwoofer, they provide real competition for many much larger systems. Their high sensitivity and smooth response will be welcome in any music system. Don Keele. Genelec Inc. Tested samples on loan from manufacturer. No audio component is perfect, and speakers are the least perfect of all. The imperfections of other components can be too small for anyone to hear, but speakersall of themhave readily audible deficiencies. The virtue of "active," or powered, speakers is that their electronics can make those defects far less audible: Dedicated electronic equalizers can minimize the speaker's frequency-response errors. Built-in amplifiers can provide the exact power that the speaker or, better yet, each driver requires and, if each driver is powered separately, precise active crossovers can be employed instead of cruder, passive ones. What's more, protective circuitry can be custom-tailored to the drivers it safeguards. Despite their obvious potential for. Why buy power again? The complexity of modern audio and home theater systems may change that. In the days of stereo, all you needed was a record player, a tuner, a tape deck, a preamplifier, and a stereo power amplifier, plus five shelves to hold everything. Today, you might have seven source components, a preamplifier, satellite receiver, and an equalizer well, I do. Who has rack space for an additional seven or eight channels' worth of amplifiers? I sure don't. So I use active speakers throughout my 7. Genelec is a fairly new name in the consumer market, but this Finnish company's active speakers are highly regarded and widely used in pro sound, where active speakers have long been common. Now, the company is angling for consumer sales, with several series of active home-theater speakers. The HT is the larger two-way speaker system in the Intimate Home Theater series there's also a three-way system , recommended for rooms of 3, to 4, cubic feet; other series are designed for rooms of under 3,, 5, to 10,, and over 10, cubic feet. The line also includes an in-wall model and two subwoofers. The HT has a inch woofer, which is unusual in a two-way speaker. The primary reason you don't see. Passive crossovers can have little or no influence on directivity, especially while retaining smooth response off axis. Better-performing satellites use 6- or 6-inch woofers at most, because such drivers are the largest ones capable of offering both a reasonable low-frequency extension and a woofer directivity that closely matches the tweeter's near the crossover 1. With electronic crossovers the designer can play a few little trade-off games regarding directivity; in the case of the HT, however, the excellent directivity over the entire operating range from 42 Hz to 22 kHz, despite the comparatively large woofer, appears to be due to the shallow, hornlike "Directivity Control Waveguide" surrounding the tweeter. The HT has two internal amplifiers: Genelec doesn't say what the hell "short-term" watts are, but who cares? Amplifier power ratings for active speakers powered subwoofers included have no signif-. We need to know how much energy comes out of the speaker, not how much energy goes in to produce that output. Of course, if manufacturer X gets dB SPL with a 2,watt amplifier and manufacturer Y does it with 20 watts, I might prefer the latter because it's easier on my electric bill. An "Autostart" function turns the unit off if no signal has been present for 5 minutes, but restarts it immediately when a new signal is received. Additional controls on the rear panel wouldn't remote controls be cool? Units currently in production have two additional features: Users will be able to select whether the LEDs remain off, show only yellow for standby and green for operation, or also show red for overload. The speaker is magnetically shielded, so you can use it near a TV set or other cathode-ray tube CRT display. The HT is relatively large for a satellite speaker. With its bass response specified as Although it has a small, 1-foot-square footprint, the cabinet occupies 2. However, HTs are now available in glossy piano black and three wood-veneer finishes, all complete with grilles prices not established at press time. As I did not have the grilles, I could. The tweeter waveguide plate can be removed and rotated 90 so the Genelec logo will be upright if you mount the speaker horizontally. The electronics panel on the rear is resiliently mounted, a pro-sound carryover that protects the system against rough handling on tour. The enclosure seems relatively tourproof, too: How did the Genelec HT measure up? Let's discuss how it performed in the lab first. Basic measurements were taken at 2 meters in my large, 7,cubic-foot, room; maximum output for a stereo-arrayed pair was measured at 4 meters in the same room. The horizontal response graph Fig. Directly on axis, its response fits in a 3 dB window from 55 Hz to 20 kHz, shelved up by approximately 2 dB between 1 and 10 kHz. Horizontal directivity is remarkably smooth and wide. This is not due to some kind of electronic trickery; there is no suggestion to that effect in Genelec's specs and literature. As it is most unusual for a inch two-way system to work this well off axis, the explanation probably lies, as I suggested earlier, in the shallow, hornlike baffle "Directivity Control Waveguide" of the tweeter. Vertical radiation patterns Fig. Below the axis, there's a sharp, deep notch at 1. Above-axis response is smooth to about 20, with notching near the crossover frequency as the angle increases. These problems are common when multiway speakers have drivers placed side by side or when vertically arrayed systems are used horizontally. I beg people with multiple listening seats to use a vertically arrayed center channel. The HT should be used vertically whenever possible, and when used for a center channel should preferably be placed below the screen. For example, the DIP switch for Bass Roll-Off a highpass filter whose slope increases from 6 to 12 dB per octave in small steps indicates cuts of 2, 4, 6, and 8 dB for frequencies below Hz, but setting the switch at -8 dB only cut response by only a little more than 5 dB. Likewise, the Bass Tilt switch which should cut 2, 4, or 6 dB below 1 kHz, depending upon its setting produced a 4 dB reduction when set in the -6 dB position. The tweeter and woofer can be turned off individually when the Mute position on the driver's DIP switch is selectedwhile this is a fantastic feature for nearfield measuring it is of no use I can think of for home listening. For a two-way satellite, the HT delivered a healthy output, though not quite as healthy as suggested by Genelec's specification dB peak per pair at 1 meter, with music. The HT's low-frequency abilities were similar to those of many "fullrange" floor-standing loudspeakers I've used. Speakers seldom have the lowfrequency dynamic capability that reference measurement levels imply. Frequently, full-range models whose measured low-frequency extension seems impressive exhibit an upward spectral balance shift at high output. To measure the Genelec's low-frequency abilities, I used a technique adopted from Don Keele: I fed the speaker ramped, 6. This is because the speaker is just leaving its linear output range at that point; as the level increases further, distortion will begin increasing exponentially. Surprisingly few two-way satellites or even full-range speakers can deliver such usable output at 40 Hz. However, the HT's usable output at 40 Hz was nearly 25 dB below its maximum clean output at higher frequencies, which occasionally caused the spectral balance shift described previously. If you want full-bandwidth dynamic capability, you'll need to use the Genelec with a subwoofer. I listened to the HT as a stereo pair. The sound was clean and clear, although somewhat aggressive. With the Treble Tilt switch set to 0 dB, there was excessive sibilance when playing Suzanne Vega's recording of "Tom's Diner" on Solitude Standing and percussion sounded somewhat overemphasized. When I set the Treble Tilt switch to -4 dB, however, voices and acoustic instruments were rendered with natural timbre and excellent detail and clarity, although the speaker still sounded slightly aggressive. The Genelecs delivered a wide, moderately deep soundstage, with excellent image placement and separation. Dynamically, the H T 2 1 0 plays damn loud, yet retains its clarity when the music gets soft or is simply played softly. There is some, but less than usual, upward spectral shift when playing full-range recordings at very loud levels. When played at full gain with ultraloud, dynamic, or ultracompressed program material Radiohead's Amnesiac, Fugees' Blunted on Reality, Jay Leonhart's Salamander Pie the H T 2 1 0 could play roughly 3 dB beyond its clean limit. At such high levels, the Genelec's limiters keep turning on and off and the sound is sometimes grossly distorted. I used hearing protection when checking this. But when you're finished abusing the speaker, there will be no burned or bottomed voice coils, and the system will play as if it were still new. The Genelec HT will reward any listener with high-quality, highoutput playback in mono, stereo, and multichannel music and film systems. It has more output capability than any other two-way home system I've ever used, and more than many inch towers. As a satellite speaker, it's a little on the large side. As a full-range speaker, it's moderate in size but with the impact of many larger floor-standing systems. Like all satellite and most full-range systems it will benefit from a subwoofer if you like high-impact low-frequency programs. As far as I'm concerned, these Genelecs would be welcome in my house anytime. Tom Nousaine. Model CS1. The CS1. That look is part of Thiel's "Coherent Source" design, which, the company says, aims to eliminate "time and phase distortions that cause alterations in the reproduced musical waveforms of most loudspeakers. The front panel is claimed to reduce parasitic resonances, and its rounded corners minimize diffraction. Thiel also uses widebandwidth drivers and true, first-order crossovers to maintain phase coherence. The result, says Thiel, is enhanced realism, clarity, transparency and immediacy, as well as improved imaging and a deeper soundstage. The woofer's construction is unusual. Instead of placing a small voice coil at the apex of a deep woofer cone, Thiel gave the CS1. This design distributes the driving force over a larger area and, by reducing the unsupported span between the coil and the cone's edge, re-. According to Thiel, it also moves the diaphragm's spurious resonances to a much higher frequency, and hence raises the driver's high-frequency cutoff. As a result of this driving system, the woofer's cone is quite shallow and its dustcap is distinctively large. The large voice coil enables Thiel to place the neodymium magnet inside the pole piece rather than outside it. This topology provides magnetic shielding; when I set a CS1. The woofer's extended response is a necessity, because of the CS1. The virtues claimed for first-order crossovers, which have gentle slopes of 6 dB per octave, are simple construction typically, one capacitor and one inductor and "phase coherence" the elimination of phase changes at the crossover frequency. The theory is that a first-order crossover keeps the two drivers in quadrature 90 apart at all frequencies, and consequently the sum of the two drivers' acoustic outputs is theoretically a perfect replica of the crossover's input. The importance of this from the standpoint of audibility has long been debated and belongs in another discussion. It's also necessary to have loudspeaker drivers that operate cleanly for two to three octaves beyond the crossover point. This is because moving-coil drivers are second-order devices, which roll off at 12 dB per octave outside their natural passband. Only very wideband drivers allow the system's roll-off to start well before the drivers'. A firstorder crossover's gentle slope also does little to suppress any irregularities in the driver's response outside its passband. So using such drivers not only requires an extended upper range for the woofer, but also a downward ex-. Thiel says quite a bit about technologies that extend the response of the CSl. Nonetheless, I neither heard nor measured any of the anomalies I'd expect if the tweeter lacked low-end response or had insufficient power handling at low frequencies. Despite the appealing simplicity of basic first-order filter design, it often. Thiel's literature says that the company's speakers "make extensive use of network compensation. The recess flares outward rapidly to a width of 4 inches at the panel's front surface. Thiel says this design reduces unwanted port noise, and my experience with the speaker backs that up. According to the company, the port design also reduces "grille loading effects," andhallelujah! However, that may have more. Magnets hidden beneath the cabinet surface hold the grille to the front baffle, eliminating grille frames and other constructions that could affect response. That baffle, by the way, is 2 inches thick, and the other enclosure panels are an inch thick, stiffening the cabinet and minimizing secondary radiation. The cabinet is not only stiff but beautifully finished, something Thiel is known for. Buyers have their choice of 15 fine cabinet finishes, at several price levels. At the other end of the scale, a pair of CS1. Custom finishes are also available. Connections are made via heavyduty multiway binding posts on the rear panel. They are not on -inch centers, so they won't accept double banana plugs, but single banana plugs work fine. By the way, you can easily convert a dual banana plug into a pair of singles with diagonal cutters. There is only one pair of connecting posts per speaker, because Thiel doesn't believe biamping or biwiring are necessary neither do I. But the company also says that it does not use separate woofer and tweeter connections. Warranty is 10 years to the original owners for any defects in material and workmanship. My basic measurements of die Thiel CS1. I also supplemented the quasianechoic measurements with 2-meter readings taken with the speaker standing on a carpeted floor to replicate normal use. In my opinion, measurements of performance on a floor should always be used when designing and evaluating a tower speaker, because its proximity to the floor will affect its response in any listening room. Floors also affect the response of stand- or shelfmounted speakers, but the effects will vary with the height at which the speaker is mounted. The characteristic on-axis response of the CS1. At higher frequencies, response slopes gently downward at approximately 3 dB per octave. Off-axis response in the horizontal plane Fig. Vertically, response deteriorates rapidly above axis Fig. Radiation below the axis Fig. I Miranda Age: User Comments 2 Post a comment Comment: In order to post a comment you have to be logged in. 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For the most part, cross-fire aiming tended to improve perceived spaciousness, tighten image precision, and make the thin bass sound fuller. Of course, much of this is undoubtedly associated with the acoustics of my listening room. Your mileage may vary.

Using learn more here adjustable feet, I tilted the speaker carefully to aim it at my ears. Even though the baffle slopes back a bit more than 10, the tweeter axis was still somewhat below the plane of my ears at a foot listening distance without this adjustment.

Spectrally, the system had very good clarity and detail Tsakiridis amplifiers suck sounded a little thin and soft in the bass; that's often the case with 6. For example, on Oscar Peterson's "You Look Good To Me," the piano, soft percussive details, and bassist Ray Brown's low-level mutterings were clearly rendered and had natural timbre, but Brown's acoustic bass was somewhat subdued.

Likewise on Carla Bley's Tsakiridis amplifiers suck Royalties," the smallest details of Tsakiridis amplifiers suck, brass, and clarinet sounds were clearly identifiable.

Although the CS1. The Thiels seldom managed to convince me the sound was not coming directly from the speakers. When I moved off-axis, the center image followed me; all 2-channel speaker systems are somewhat subject to this effect, but not always to this extent. Tsakiridis amplifiers suck recordings with loud bass, the CS1.

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For example, the strong bass line on Roy Orbison's "Dream You" just Tsakiridis amplifiers suck at high levels, and the percussion on The Sheffield Track Record and Joe Farrell's kick drum in "Upon This Tsakiridis amplifiers suck went 'pop, pop' instead of delivering go here solid whack to the sternum.

Similarly, when turned up to high levels, Heart's "Magic Man" tended to shriek. The pair of Thiels did, however, sound clean, with no obvious distortion and only modest spectral shift at levels up to 99 dB SPL at a foot listening distance in a large room. On material with very low frequency content Bass Connection's "Drivin' Bass"overload would occur at 80 dB SPL, but with Tsakiridis amplifiers suck little noise from the port.

These dynamic limitations are of limited importance for jazz, soft rock, middle-of-the-road music, and all but the most challenging classical material but I wouldn't recommend the CS1. The Thiel CS1. Adding a subwoofer will generally make the system useful with a wider range of more dynamic programming, but it will never be suitable for head-banging. Home theater? By themselves, the Thiels lack the loudness and bass for that, unless you add a subwooferand Tsakiridis amplifiers suck long as you're doing that, you might want smaller speakers anyway.

Tsakiridis amplifiers suck

And somehow, I can't see their styling fitting gracefully into a multichannel system. What should we expect from a twoway speaker in the CS1. Excellent cosmetics?

Thiel nails it; great finish, state of the Tsakiridis amplifiers suck grille. Excellent spectral presentation? Right on, Thiel. A design philosophy and interesting tech story that will keep Tsakiridis amplifiers suck loving these speakers through the years?

That's here in spades.

So please either register or login.

State-of-the-art dynamics? Nonot with a 6. In all, the CS1.

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That's about all you can expect from any Tsakiridis amplifiers suck system. Yes, there are systems that work nearly as well for a lot less money.

But, I can't think Tsakiridis amplifiers suck any that have nearly this nice a finish. Ohm Acoustics Corp. OhmSpeakers aol. Editor's Note: The origin of the unique Walsh driver appears to have been forgotten, or at least allowed to lapse into some kind of vague folklore, Tsakiridis amplifiers suck years; the following is the "official" version, which I can confidently tellbecause I was there.

Ohm Acoustics was founded in by Tsakiridis amplifiers suck Gersten, a self-taught loudspeaker designer, for no other reason than to become employed again after he had lost his job at Rectilinear a speaker company that went out of business many years ago.

Gersten had Tsakiridis amplifiers suck silent partners with a financial interest in the new company; I was one of them. I was still in the advertising business at the time; three years later I sold all of my stock back to the company, Tsakiridis amplifiers suck for the past 29 years I've had nothing to do with Ohm-just to reassure the three or four aging conspiracy theorists who still haven't given up trying to catch me in a conflict of interest.

At first the company made only conventional "monkey coffins" as rectangular box speakers were condescendingly called in those daysbut soon Lincoln Walsh, whom Gersten had known for some time, entered into negotiation with Ohm to have his patented loudspeaker invention developed, manufactured, and marketed.

I would never have become involved with Ohmwhose name was actually my suggestionif I hadn't known that the Walsh speaker was coming Lincoln Walsh was a veteran engineer, a member of the team that had developed radar during Tsakiridis amplifiers suck War II and the designer of the legendary Brook triode am.

His loudspeaker invention was based on a simple more info No speaker cone is actually a piston, in the sense that its perimeter moves the same instant as its apex is set in motion Tsakiridis amplifiers suck the voice coil.

It takes a finite amount of time for an impulse to travel from the apex to the perimeter. Tsakiridis amplifiers suck good woofer cone appears to be a piston only because the wavelengths it reproduces are so large that the transmission time from apex to perimeter represents only a tiny fraction of the wavelength and does not result in a perceptible ripple or breakup.

A cone reproducing the full audio range, however, inevitably ripples and breaks up, because the higher-frequency wavelengths are only inches and the cone is relatively large, requiring several cycle durations for the signal to travel from apex to perimeter. This is true of all cones, regardless of cone material or geometry. They are, in effect, transmission lines, albeit poor ones. So Lincoln Walsh said, "If you can't lick'em, join'em! He inverted the driver and turned it apex up, so it fired downward into the enclosure, with the sound coming off the click here side of the cone.

He made the cone material stiff, so that sound waves were transmitted in it at a calculated speed that was much higher than in air, and he made the slope of the cone exactly such that the horizontal vector of the transmission synthesized a coherent cylindrical wave front in the air, starting at the cone surround Fig.

One cone Tsakiridis amplifiers suck the full audio spectrum, omnidirectionally, without crossovers and without any interference with the original waveforms as seen by the voice coil.

Note that any old inverted, downward-firing cone driver is, when you think about it, a Walsh driver, just a very bad one. The Walsh design then went through numerous experimental and production models.

Tsakiridis amplifiers suck

In my opinion, the perfect Walsh driver has yet to be made; if it were made, it would be the world's simplest, most beautiful, most unproblematic speaker design. Perhaps German Physiks, a. This, of course, is a simplistic summary of the theory behind invention; in the real world there were huge problems efficiency, cone this web page issues, resonances and what resonances! Frankfurt company, has come closest to it, at a very steep price, since the expiration of the patentbut that's Tsakiridis amplifiers suck story.

Ohm Acoustics, whose ownership shifted several times over the decades and is now headed by John Strohbeen formerly of the defunct Tech HiFi chainended up making the speaker neither full-range nor omnidirectionalthat's how they got around the design challenges. Lincoln Walsh Tsakiridis amplifiers suck be a little restless about that in his grave he died Tsakiridis amplifiers suck the early 70sbut at least the major problems have been eliminated.

Peter Aczel Acoustic barriers now partially surround the downward-facing driver to reduce rear sound radiation, Tsakiridis amplifiers suck a tweeter has been added. Both changes tailor the speaker's lateral coverage so that listeners toward the left of the room will hear more of the right speaker than they would from conventional speakers, and listeners toward the right will hear more of the left speaker.

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This compensates for the precedence effect, which makes the stereo image collapse toward the nearer speaker whose sound arrives first and is louder for listeners who are not equidistant from both. The tweeter which I consider a supertweeter, as it operates only from 8 kHz up also augments the high-frequency response. Ohm does, however, offer a few models in the original omnidirectional format, for special Tsakiridis amplifiers suck such as surround channels or background music.

The company suggests using the Mk-2's only for rooms up to 15 by 25 feet square feet. For rooms up to 25 by 32 feet square feetthe Mk-2's are recommended, while the smaller Mk-2's are for rooms 14 x 20 feet square feet or smaller. According to Ohm, all these speakers have such robust bass that subwoofers are not needed. All Ohm speakers are sold factory direct, with a check this out two-month home trial program. The Walsh Mk-2 is a direct descendant of the Ohm Walsh 4 sold in the s.

Our review sample, in fact, started out as a Walsh 4. This was possible because Ohm provides an upgrade program for older systems; Ivan Berger's sidebar tells what it's like to upgrade an older model.

Ivan's upgrade involved replacing the drivers and crossovers, which are built into a squat, perforated-metal cylinder roughly 9 inches in diameter and 8 inches high. The two drivers within the cylinder are a Walsh driver, 10 inches in diameter, and a dome tweeter. The head. The inverted conical surface of the cone driver radiates all the system's sound omnidirectionally except in the top octave, where the small dome tweeter mounted on top of the Walsh driver's magnet assembly takes over.

When the speakers are set up in a normal listening configuration, the tweeter is aimed 45 laterally off the frontal axis of the system towards the inside space between the speakers. An oversized, trapezoidal space frame made of metal and covered in grille cloth Tsakiridis amplifiers suck over the cylinder and completely covers the top of the system.

The cabinet of the Mk-2 is a straight-sided, vented enclosure that's deeper than it is wide. It's constructed of Black indian Tsakiridis amplifiers suck plywood covered with real wood veneer on all four sides. Ample internal cross-bracing increases the cabinet's rigidity. The vent is a port tube, 2 inches in diameter and 15 inches long, or about half the cabinet's height; the tube exits through a hole on Tsakiridis amplifiers suck cabinet's bottom.

Signal connections are made via a single set of goldplated, double-banana five-way binding posts, also on the bottom. The posts can handle wire up to a generous 0. Four furniture casters make it easy to move the Walsh Mk-2 around. Why roll-around casters rather than spikes or feet?

Ohm believes you'll get the best from speakers if you can easily experiment to find what location and orientation optimize imaging and bass response. Ohm points out and I emphatically agree that Tsakiridis amplifiers suck very audible changes that result from repositioning speakers make a far bigger difference than the subtle changes that occur when using different types of cabinet feet.

Also, there is no possibility of the cabinet's moving back and forth during. I measured Tsakiridis amplifiers suck performance of Ohm Acoustics' Walsh Mk-2 in my usual way: In addition to my customary tests, I did a complete set of horizontal off-axis response curves every 10 completely around the Ohm to investigate its full-circle lateral soundfield.

The test microphone was located at a distance of one meter from, and aimed at a point three inches below, the top of the driver's cylindrical cage; a 2. One-tenth-octave smoothing Tsakiridis amplifiers suck used in all the following curves. Figure Tsakiridis amplifiers suck shows various horizontal off-axis frequency responses of the Ohm Tsakiridis amplifiers suck. Normally, my first graph is of onaxis frequency response but, with this speaker, where would "on axis" be?

Directly in front of the cabinet? At some unspecified horizontal angle to the cabinet's front panel? Someplace else? Only after waving around a microphone connected to a real-time third-octave spectrum analyzer Tsakiridis amplifiers suck I get a general idea. The maximum Tsakiridis amplifiers suck appeared. Maximum radiation vertically appeared to be roughly aligned with a point about one-third the way down from the top of the cylindrical cage. The lateral direction and height coincide with the supposed radiating direction and vertical location of the system's tweeter.

There was no way to get into the driver cage and check my hunch. The Ohm's frequency response at various horizontal angles is shown two ways: Consider "inside" as Tsakiridis amplifiers suck direction from either speaker of a stereo pair toward a centered listener, and "outside" as the direction from Tsakiridis amplifiers suck speaker to the room's nearer side wall. Figure 2a shows response from 90 outside to 90 inside in 30 steps, plus a 45 inside curve that corresponds to the direction of strongest response.

The symmetry of the response curves around this 45 curve is clearly evident. The 30, 45, and 60 inside curves essentially lie one on top of the other, which indicates excellent directional uniformity. Note that the 0 and 90 inside. Outboard of the 0 straight-ahead curve, there is substantial high-frequency rolloff above 1 kHz, increasing with the angle. This, and the fact that the main response axis is toed in at 45, help make early reflections from the room walls less troublesome.

But between 0 and 90 inside, coverage is quite uniform. As far as smoothness and Tsakiridis amplifiers suck balance Tsakiridis amplifiers suck concerned, the 30, 45, and 60 inside curves are quite well behaved, except for a slight uptilt in high-frequency response above 14 kHz and a moderate depression in the midrange response between about Tsakiridis amplifiers suck and 3 kHz.

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Tsakiridis amplifiers suck less maintenance and no tune-ups, and after each race a recharge from his portable generator costs about 30 cents. I ask him how the Tsakiridis amplifiers suck feels when he takes off. I cover the first 60 feet in 1. You feel the acceleration pull your face back. I do one-eighth of a mile in 6 seconds, reaching mph. The last eighth, the performance falls off because I have no transmission.

So, this is the right thing to do - for ecology, and to get kids interested in the whole idea. Well, all right! I squeeze into Tsakiridis amplifiers suck seat, scraping my knees on the aluminum body and bumping my head on the roll bar. Don't even think of touching it. That would initiate the race sequence.

I imagine myself fumbling for it as Tsakiridis amplifiers suck car winds up and shoots toward the chain-link perimeter fence feet away. Probably I could hit the switch around the same time the car hit the fence. Still, this is no time to wimp out. I press it, and the car rolls forward. There's no suspension, so I feel every crack in the asphalt. The dragster makes an electric grinding noise, like an old-fashioned streetcar. The "pit area" at Woodburn is a desolate expanse like an abandoned parking lot.

Finally I wrestle it back to his trailer. Electronerds race machines crammed full of batteries that deliver Tsakiridis amplifiers suck of power up to 1, amps. A couple hours later the gas-guzzlers arrive: The race fee is only 20 bucks, and you can make as many runs down the track as visit web page permits. I walk among the cars as they line up with their engines rumbling, while the drivers' girlfriends sit on the bleachers eating corn dogs and drinking 7-Up.

Then the racing starts, and it sounds as if tigers are being tortured here among the wheat fields. Screaming tires, roaring motors - it's a testosterone-fueled, head-hammering ritual as the Tsakiridis amplifiers suck pair off like elks banging their antlers together at the start of the mating season. Bearing in mind that "knee trembler" was s Liverpudlian slang for a stand-up article source job, it's no surprise to see the vocabulary of fuel injection and blowers superchargers perverted in a dashboard sticker that reads, "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown.

In fact, this event reeks even more of sublimated sex than of exhaust fumes - and the noise Tsakiridis amplifiers suck an intrinsic element.

He spins the fat tires to warm the rubber for better adhesion, and Tsakiridis amplifiers suck - he's gone!

His dragster drifts away like a source Tsakiridis amplifiers suck the breeze, easily outpacing his rival, a 5-liter behemoth that bellows futilely as it falls behind. The gasoline-car drivers look at each other as if to say, What the fuck? If a man with a high-powered https://woodpornx.me/vegetable/web-2020-05-14.php wandered into a primitive tribe where they'd been duking it out Tsakiridis amplifiers suck wooden clubs, I imagine the reaction would be the same.

The technology gap is so extreme, it makes the whole game seem pointless. The next day - Saturday - the gas-guzzlers are gone and the pit area is invaded by smart, hairy geeks swigging Evian water and chattering jargon like Tsakiridis amplifiers suck freaks. Every one of them is male, except for some wives and girlfriends.

Tsakiridis amplifiers suck

Yes, the electronerds are here - and the bleachers are empty. The event was listed in the track's Tsakiridis amplifiers suck, but the locals have chosen to stay home. Still, there's no shortage of cars and drivers. Roderick Wilde's Maniac Mazda RX7 is a fearsome creation, crammed full of batteries and looking slightly beat-up, Tsakiridis amplifiers suck a prize fighter with a history. John Wayland has brought his White Zombie, cranked to Tsakiridis amplifiers suck higher voltage and plastered with slogans: Question internal combustion Plasma Boy Racing.

The explosion generated a terrifying ball of blue plasma crackling with electric discharges. Not far away, Don Crabtree, a sewing-machine design engineer, stands by his record-breaking volt motorcycle powered by wheelchair batteries.

I wander over to a red Toyota MR2, as shiny as if it just came out of a showroom. Its owner is Bob Boyd, a white-haired Air Force veteran. This is more fun. He retired 24 years ago, but at 78, he still loves speed and, like most electric racers, is a self-taught engineer.

So, you learned to do it yourself. Kids who grow up around farms are pretty handy with tools. He consulted John Wayland before tackling his project, then spent about 18 months working on it.

So, I built this for fun. It draws up to 1, amps from 16 batteries, volts. To recharge it, Link just plug it into a standard volt outlet. Boyd's car is immaculately executed; the only clue that it's not a regular Toyota is the electric plug hiding Tsakiridis amplifiers suck a gas filler pipe should be. Boyd financed the conversion without any sponsors. So, I took a pretty Tsakiridis amplifiers suck car and tore it up, converted it.

You could do the same thing a Tsakiridis amplifiers suck cheaper. His maximum range is 40 miles between recharges, continue reading he feels this is perfectly adequate. Why don't they drive an electric? It's a whole bunch cheaper, like burning fuel at 14 cents a gallon. And of course it's nonpolluting. But the open combustion of coal or natural gas in power stations is inherently more efficient than an internal combustion engine, which creates noxious gases and a huge amount of waste heat.

Also, as Boyd points out, hydroelectric power produces no pollutants at all.

Therefore, electric vehicles really do have the potential to reduce emissions nationwide. Also, if millions of Americans went electric, existing power plants might still satisfy the demand, because most recharging would be done at night, when the load is lowest. I question Boyd about the valuable metals locked up Tsakiridis amplifiers suck batteries. In response, he claims that the modern lead-acid batteries used in almost all amateur car conversions are 95 percent recyclable.

When I talk to other builders at the event, they give me the same well-practiced pro-electric sales pitch - Tsakiridis amplifiers suck it's persuasive.

Sex profielen Watch Brit milfs fucked in the club Video Cameroon sexy. His loudspeaker invention was based on a simple insight: No speaker cone is actually a piston, in the sense that its perimeter moves the same instant as its apex is set in motion by the voice coil. It takes a finite amount of time for an impulse to travel from the apex to the perimeter. A good woofer cone appears to be a piston only because the wavelengths it reproduces are so large that the transmission time from apex to perimeter represents only a tiny fraction of the wavelength and does not result in a perceptible ripple or breakup. A cone reproducing the full audio range, however, inevitably ripples and breaks up, because the higher-frequency wavelengths are only inches and the cone is relatively large, requiring several cycle durations for the signal to travel from apex to perimeter. This is true of all cones, regardless of cone material or geometry. They are, in effect, transmission lines, albeit poor ones. So Lincoln Walsh said, "If you can't lick'em, join'em! He inverted the driver and turned it apex up, so it fired downward into the enclosure, with the sound coming off the convex side of the cone. He made the cone material stiff, so that sound waves were transmitted in it at a calculated speed that was much higher than in air, and he made the slope of the cone exactly such that the horizontal vector of the transmission synthesized a coherent cylindrical wave front in the air, starting at the cone surround Fig. One cone covered the full audio spectrum, omnidirectionally, without crossovers and without any interference with the original waveforms as seen by the voice coil. Note that any old inverted, downward-firing cone driver is, when you think about it, a Walsh driver, just a very bad one. The Walsh design then went through numerous experimental and production models. In my opinion, the perfect Walsh driver has yet to be made; if it were made, it would be the world's simplest, most beautiful, most unproblematic speaker design. Perhaps German Physiks, a. This, of course, is a simplistic summary of the theory behind invention; in the real world there were huge problems efficiency, cone material issues, resonances and what resonances! Frankfurt company, has come closest to it, at a very steep price, since the expiration of the patentbut that's another story. Ohm Acoustics, whose ownership shifted several times over the decades and is now headed by John Strohbeen formerly of the defunct Tech HiFi chain , ended up making the speaker neither full-range nor omnidirectionalthat's how they got around the design challenges. Lincoln Walsh may be a little restless about that in his grave he died in the early 70s , but at least the major problems have been eliminated. Peter Aczel Acoustic barriers now partially surround the downward-facing driver to reduce rear sound radiation, and a tweeter has been added. Both changes tailor the speaker's lateral coverage so that listeners toward the left of the room will hear more of the right speaker than they would from conventional speakers, and listeners toward the right will hear more of the left speaker. This compensates for the precedence effect, which makes the stereo image collapse toward the nearer speaker whose sound arrives first and is louder for listeners who are not equidistant from both. The tweeter which I consider a supertweeter, as it operates only from 8 kHz up also augments the high-frequency response. Ohm does, however, offer a few models in the original omnidirectional format, for special applications such as surround channels or background music. The company suggests using the Mk-2's only for rooms up to 15 by 25 feet square feet. For rooms up to 25 by 32 feet square feet , the Mk-2's are recommended, while the smaller Mk-2's are for rooms 14 x 20 feet square feet or smaller. According to Ohm, all these speakers have such robust bass that subwoofers are not needed. All Ohm speakers are sold factory direct, with a generous two-month home trial program. The Walsh Mk-2 is a direct descendant of the Ohm Walsh 4 sold in the s. Our review sample, in fact, started out as a Walsh 4. This was possible because Ohm provides an upgrade program for older systems; Ivan Berger's sidebar tells what it's like to upgrade an older model. Ivan's upgrade involved replacing the drivers and crossovers, which are built into a squat, perforated-metal cylinder roughly 9 inches in diameter and 8 inches high. The two drivers within the cylinder are a Walsh driver, 10 inches in diameter, and a dome tweeter. The head. The inverted conical surface of the cone driver radiates all the system's sound omnidirectionally except in the top octave, where the small dome tweeter mounted on top of the Walsh driver's magnet assembly takes over. When the speakers are set up in a normal listening configuration, the tweeter is aimed 45 laterally off the frontal axis of the system towards the inside space between the speakers. An oversized, trapezoidal space frame made of metal and covered in grille cloth fits over the cylinder and completely covers the top of the system. The cabinet of the Mk-2 is a straight-sided, vented enclosure that's deeper than it is wide. It's constructed of layer birch plywood covered with real wood veneer on all four sides. Ample internal cross-bracing increases the cabinet's rigidity. The vent is a port tube, 2 inches in diameter and 15 inches long, or about half the cabinet's height; the tube exits through a hole on the cabinet's bottom. Signal connections are made via a single set of goldplated, double-banana five-way binding posts, also on the bottom. The posts can handle wire up to a generous 0. Four furniture casters make it easy to move the Walsh Mk-2 around. Why roll-around casters rather than spikes or feet? Ohm believes you'll get the best from speakers if you can easily experiment to find what location and orientation optimize imaging and bass response. Ohm points out and I emphatically agree that the very audible changes that result from repositioning speakers make a far bigger difference than the subtle changes that occur when using different types of cabinet feet. Also, there is no possibility of the cabinet's moving back and forth during. I measured the performance of Ohm Acoustics' Walsh Mk-2 in my usual way: In addition to my customary tests, I did a complete set of horizontal off-axis response curves every 10 completely around the Ohm to investigate its full-circle lateral soundfield. The test microphone was located at a distance of one meter from, and aimed at a point three inches below, the top of the driver's cylindrical cage; a 2. One-tenth-octave smoothing was used in all the following curves. Figure 2a shows various horizontal off-axis frequency responses of the Ohm Walsh. Normally, my first graph is of onaxis frequency response but, with this speaker, where would "on axis" be? Directly in front of the cabinet? At some unspecified horizontal angle to the cabinet's front panel? Someplace else? Only after waving around a microphone connected to a real-time third-octave spectrum analyzer did I get a general idea. The maximum radiation appeared. Maximum radiation vertically appeared to be roughly aligned with a point about one-third the way down from the top of the cylindrical cage. The lateral direction and height coincide with the supposed radiating direction and vertical location of the system's tweeter. There was no way to get into the driver cage and check my hunch. The Ohm's frequency response at various horizontal angles is shown two ways: Consider "inside" as the direction from either speaker of a stereo pair toward a centered listener, and "outside" as the direction from the speaker to the room's nearer side wall. Figure 2a shows response from 90 outside to 90 inside in 30 steps, plus a 45 inside curve that corresponds to the direction of strongest response. The symmetry of the response curves around this 45 curve is clearly evident. The 30, 45, and 60 inside curves essentially lie one on top of the other, which indicates excellent directional uniformity. Note that the 0 and 90 inside. Outboard of the 0 straight-ahead curve, there is substantial high-frequency rolloff above 1 kHz, increasing with the angle. This, and the fact that the main response axis is toed in at 45, help make early reflections from the room walls less troublesome. But between 0 and 90 inside, coverage is quite uniform. As far as smoothness and spectral balance are concerned, the 30, 45, and 60 inside curves are quite well behaved, except for a slight uptilt in high-frequency response above 14 kHz and a moderate depression in the midrange response between about Hz and 3 kHz. However, such directionindependent response anomalies are easy to handle with appropriate equalization. The speaker's sensitivity, averaged from Hz to 4 kHz, was 84 dB; that's 3 dB less than specified by Ohm, primarily because the depression in the system's output between Hz and 3 kHz happened to roughly coincide with my sensitivity measurement span. Right-left matching was good; the right and left speakers agreeing within 1. The grille of the Mk-2 had minimal effect on response. Figure 2b shows the directional response of the Ohm Walsh over the full audible frequency range. I chose this method of display rather than the usual horizontal off-axis "waterfall" display because it makes the Ohm's radiation pattern more understandable. The vertical. Positive angles are to the inside, negative angles to the outside. The horizontal axis displays frequency, from 20 Hz to 20 kHz. The display has been normalized to the 45 inside frequency response, the direction of the strongest radiation; this is equivalent to making measurements after the speaker's frequency response has been equalized to be flat at an inside angle of The top left " - 1 " curve shows, for example, that the Ohm's response is down 1 dB at an inside angle of for frequencies from about 50 to Hz. Levels at intermediate points can be read from the color coding, which is explained by the color scale at the bottom left of the graph. Now that we have this fancy colored graph, what does it all mean? If you take slices of the graph along the frequency horizontal axis at a particular angle relative to the speaker's axis, you'll see the speaker's frequency response at that angle. If you take slices of the display along the angle vertical axis at a particular frequency, you'll see the Ohm's lateral polar response at that particular angle. If a speaker were omnidirectional in the horizontal plane at all frequencies, the entire graph would be yellow. If the speaker radiated sound only to 45 on either side of its axis, but had a perfect directional radiation pattern between those two angles, the graph would show a horizontal yellow bar that rapidly changed to red and then black at angles beyond This would mean that, within 45, the speaker had flat frequency response at every horizontal angle, or precisely even horizontal coverage at each frequency. Of course, real-world loudspeakers are not this well-behaved. Getting back to the Ohm Walsh Mk-2, Fig. Horizontal off-axis frequency response contour plot response normalized to the response at 45 inside ; see text. In the range from 0 to 90 inside, the response is very uniform over the whole frequency range the graph is mostly yellow in this range. The speaker is clearly omnidirectional below 1 kHz, but above that frequency its output is pretty much restricted to the range from straight ahead 0 to 90 inside. Shown in Figs. Above-axis response Fig. To check Ohm's claim that the Walsh Mk-2 preserves waveforms, I measured the speaker's phase and group delay responses at the 45 inside horizontal angle. For both measurements, I set the receive delay of my analyzer to coincide with the arrival of the tweeter's signal, which flattens the phase response above 5 kHz, primarily in the tweeter's frequency range. The measured phase response Fig. If it were, its phase response would be flat and near 0 over the whole frequency range, assuming its amplitude response was also reasonably flat. However, the Ohm's phase rotates only by about from 20 Hz to 20 kHz, much less than in typical two- or three-way speakers. The group delay Fig. Above Hz, the average group delay varies only by about us 0. The irregularities in the group delay are directly due to bumpiness in the amplitude response the "45" curve in Fig. Although the phase and group delay re-. Interestingly, the Ohm Walsh driver's output at middle and low frequencies leads the tweeter's output, rather than lagging behind as it would in most two- or three-way directradiator speakers. Spatially, this is an offset of about 2. Figures 6a and 6b show the Mk2's input impedance magnitude and phase from 20 Hz to 20 kHz. The impedance magnitude drops to a low of 3. The Ohm Walsh should be an easy load for any power amplifier or home-theater receiver. Below 20 Hz not shown in either graph the Mk-2's impedance magnitude continually rises as frequency is lowered and the phase approaches a constant angle of This indicates that a capacitor is in series with the input of the system, which I verified with an ohmmeter. Because a capacitor very nicely limits input below 20 Hz, where the woofer can be easily overloaded. An excellent addition, especially considering that input capacitors on loudspeaker systems are extremely rare due to the high cost of the high-value, high-quality components required. The last two graphs Figs. The details of the test methods are outlined in my review of Definitive Technology's Stu-. The distortion of the Mk-2 was measured in the nearfield, with both systems on the floor in the middle of my listening room. The systems were lying on their side, at right angles to each other, with the bottom of one system facing the top of the other, and were driven in parallel. This configuration allowed the acoustic output of the head unit of one system to properly combine with the port output of the other to form an effective overall response measurement. The sine-wave harmonic distortion of the Mk-2 between 40 and Hz Fig. The second through fifth harmonics were included in the distortion calculations. The measured distortion rose into objectionable ranges only below 25 Hz. Above that frequency, the Mk-2 sounded quite clean, even at the maximum tested power. Interestingly, all three harmonic distortion curves reached minimums at about 60 Hz. This behavior would normally be associated with a speaker's vented-box resonance, but the Ohm's resonant frequency is considerably lower. I determined this by measuring the port's output in the nearfield and finding that it reached a peak at 45 Hz, quite close to the 40 Hz impedance dip seen in Fig. I believe the box tuning is closer to this lower value. This was just one sign that the Ohm Walsh Mk-2, despite its ported cabinet, does not act like a conventional vented-box speaker. The impedance magnitude curve does not show the usual second peak below the box resonance. More important, though the Ohm's distortion is rising below resonance, it does not rise as dramatically as. I believe this is due to the effect of an internal damping blanket stretched across the bottom of the driver cage, just below the woofer-midrange. The air moved by the woofer must pass through this acoustic resistance to reach the inside of the enclosure. This changes the system from a pure vented box into a lossy design, which is somewhat closer to a closed box that doesn't exhibit the rapid rise in distortion below box resonance. The Ohm enclosure's design effectively combines the advantages of a vented box, with its distortion-reducing capabilities at and near box resonance, with the power-handling capability of a closed box at low frequencies. Figure 7b shows the system's twotone intermodulation distortion IM , evaluated at the same power levels as in the previous test. Two equal-level tones, one at Hz and the other swept from 20 to Hz, were applied to the system. The intermodulation sidebands around the higher frequency were evaluated out to the third order, and the test results expressed as a percentage of the energy of the two original test tones. The Ohm's IM was not too objectionable subjectively, even at the watt power level and at 20 Hz. All in all, the Mk-2 did quite well in the harmonic and intermodulation tests. It performed well all the way down to 20 or 25 Hz. The Ohm Walsh Mk-2 speakers were shipped in five separate boxes: This allowed me to unpack and assemble the heavy parts of each speaker separately, which made unpacking and setup a breeze. Assembly consisted of at-. Ohm eases this process by providing a screwdriver with extra long shank to clear the top of the head unit, a nice touch. The head unit is connected to the cabinet by a heavy-duty industrial connector wired with heavy-gauge, audiophile-grade stranded cable. As stated before, connection to the system is via a pair of double-banana jacks mounted somewhat inconveniently on the bottom of the system. I would have preferred having the connectors mounted on the rear, but that would have interfered with the clean look of the cabinet when viewed from behind. Remember that Ohm makes an omnidirectional version of this system for use in surround channels , which might be visible from all four sides. Ohm recommends that, for best imaging and smoothest bass, the Walsh Mk-2 speakers should be spaced wide apart, relatively close to the rear wall, and at least two feet from the corner and side walls. Ohm also suggests a laterally asymmetric room placement to further smooth the bass response. For proper imaging, the speakers should be set up so that the front of each cabinet the side with the Ohm logo faces straight into the room; this ensures that the speakers' main radiation axes cross in front of the listener. Following Ohm's instructions, I set the speakers up about nine feet apart, spaced them about one to two feet from the rear wall, and made sure that each speaker was facing forward and in the correct channel; the right and left systems are marked with arrows normally hidden by the grille that should point towards the center of the room. Once set up, the Ohms looked quite handsometall and slendereven though their appearance is very atypical for speakers, because the grille extends from the top of each cabinet rather than covering about two thirds of its front. The roll-around casters not only added to the. Upgrading Old Ohms Although some mostly high-end electronics can be upgraded to incorporate recent improvements, few speakers can. It's too awkward to ship any but the smallest speakers back to the factory for upgrades, and do-it-yourselfers encounter the problem of removing and replacing glued-in drivers or delving into scratchy fiberglass to remove and replace crossovers. Ohm's Walsh speakers are an exception. An Ohm Walsh speaker's drivers and crossover are part of a one-piece assembly the sealed cage that frustrated Don Keele that's screwed-not glued-in place; this makes installation easy. That leaves a few remaining details, but they're usually simple ones. My own Walsh 4's being odd years old, I thought it time to bring them up to date; that would be a lot cheaper than replacing my old Ohms with new ones. The update made them almost clones of the Mk-2's in the accompanying review. At first, the job looked simple. For my Walshes, the driver can is attached to a squarish board that's secured to the cabinet by four extremely large, easyto-tighten thumbscrews, and a single plug connects the driver can to the cabinet's wiring. To retune the cabinet for the new drivers, I had to slip the old port tube out of the cabinet bottom and replace it with the new one Ohm provided. The company says this retuning yields deeper bass. Owners of Ohms less than about 10 years old have the option of prying out the panel that holds the spring-clip input terminals which accept double-banana plugs and hotgluing a new panel, with multi-way binding posts, in its place. For my ancient Ohm, replacing the panel was not optional. When I took off the old driver assemblies and unpacked the new ones, I discovered that the new assemblies had a two-pin plug and my cabinet had a three-pin connector. That was because Ohm used to mount the crossover on the input panel, but now puts it in the driver cage. It took me and Ohm a while to get that straightened out and for me to receive and install the plugs I needed; luckily, I had other speakers I could use while I waited. In changing the input panel, I lost one feature of the old Walsh: I regret their loss a little, but I can't say whether I really need them or just miss having something to tweak. Ohm's most expensive speaker, the Walsh 5 Mk-2, retains these controls but Ohm's other models don't. According to John Strohbeen,. Ohm's president, these other speakers are designed for specific room sizes, and the Walsh 5 retains these controls "to allow our biggest system to be used in small rooms. But the thumbscrews and screw holes that attach the driver platform to the cabinet are arranged asymmetrically, ensuring that it can only be mounted with the drivers facing front. At first, the new assembly wouldn't drop into position. Then I realized that my cabinets had warped a small fraction of an inch over the years; when I spread their walls slightly with a screwdriver, the driver platforms dropped into place. Because so much time elapsed while the mismatched-plug problem was sorted out, I can't really say how well my upgraded Ohms compare to my original pair. But I can say that they perform almost identically to the Mk-2's, which use the same drivers and crossovers. The old and new cabinets have the same enclosure volume, but different construction. My enclosures are of veneered fiberboard, with sloping sides and heavy internal bracing. Current enclosures are of veneered birch plywood, with straight sides and slightly less bracing. That's enough to add a decibel or two of output between 40 and 60 Hz, which would probably be unnoticeable in normal listening. The price of an upgrade kit varies with the model. Upgrade prices for other models can be found on Ohm's Web site. For speaker upgrades, Ohm's free home trial period is 60 days long, and its limited warranty on parts and labor runs three years-not as long as for new Ohms, but still generous. Frankly, I'm not much concerned about the warranty, since my original Ohms worked without a hitch for more than 20 years. The cabinet's fit and finish were very good, with top-rate coloring and grain on the wood side panels. The Ohms' imaging, soundstaging, and spaciousness were distinctly different. These differences were not quite as apparent when I was sitting in my usual listening position, on the center line between the speakers. But oh, what a difference when I stood up and walked back and forth in front of the speakers, or walked closer to or in between them! The Ohms always maintained a more stable center image as I moved across the room. On most program material, the Ohms created a wide and stable soundstage, very realistic and spacious, with images that extended way behind the rear wall. On material recorded in a large space with significant reverberation such as choral, orchestral, and pipe-organ music , the Ohms' added spaciousness and realism were stunning. I almost always preferred the Ohms' sound on percussion instruments such as cymbals, drum rim shots, wood blocks, bells, etc. I also preferred the Ohms on well-recorded chamber music, where the systems' added spaciousness increased the realism significantly. Often, when I switched from. As an experiment, I tried re-aiming the Walshes, turning them 45 outward facing their inside corners straight into the room so that their axes of maximum radiation would directly face die listening area rather than crossing in front of it. This essentially negated the evenness of the Walshes' side-to-side coverage; but it hardly affected their spaciousness, because the speakers still had significant sound radiation to the sides and rear, which increased room reflections. The Walsh Mk-2's sometimes added an upper-bass chestiness to both male and female vocals, although otherwise the realism added by the Ohms on vocals was very compelling and appealing. The Walsh Mk2's also sounded somewhat distant at times, although this had more to do with their frequency response than with the spaciousness or reverberation that they added. Moving the Ohms closer to the corners elevated the bass level but did not improve the control. The Mk-2's could be played. But they also did justice to more sedate music because of their spaciousness and realism. The Ohm Walsh Mk-2's have some extremely uncommon capabilities. Their nearly sound radiation pattern below 1 kHz, and the way this maximizes room reflections, yields a strikingly realistic soundfield that extends across and between the speakers, and even behind them. This is both an advantage and a disadvantage, because it potentially makes the systems more dependent on room acoustics. The speakers' tailored radiation pattern provides a stable center image and soundstage for listeners located almost anywhere in the listening area, with no need to be equidistant from the loudspeakers. The Ohms add a large degree of spaciousness and airiness to anything that is played through them. Recordings intended to sound dry however, may not be so dry when played through these speakers. And the Ohms' robust bass capability should appeal to even pipe-organ aficionados. The Walsh Mk-2 speakers can also be played loud and clean. Do I like them? But before you run out and buy a pair you should definitely listen to them, to decide if their distinctive sound and uncommon capabilities suit your expectations and desires. Ohm makes this easy by offering a full money-back day home trial, so you can try them out in your own listening setup for up to two months, then return them for full credit if you are displeased. For me, the Ohm Walsh Mk-2's' soundfield-enhancing capabilities outweighed such minor problems as moderate tonal imbalances and the addition of spaciousness to material intended to sound dry. Its cabinet is all curves, with hardly a parallel surface in sight; its only flat surfaces, in fact, are its front baffle and its bottom. Even in a head-on front view, it's saved from conventionality by the curvy transmission-line tweeter enclosure atop the cabinet. This visually arresting design simultaneously addresses the issues of diffraction, standing waves, and rigidity. The bass and midrange are handled by a 6. The deep red cherry pair we auditioned had topnotch fit and finish. The stands, which are available in black or aluminum finish, mount securely to metal plates on the speakers' undersides. There was still adequate bass down to just below 55 Hz, and the speakers were quite flat in the midbass where the response of many mini-monitors is tipped up but delivered a bit of excess energy in the Hz range. In my listening room, I measured a small trough of about 4 dB in the range from to 1, Hz, but on many recordings that's a boon; it also has been shown that a dip in this region seems to add more sense of depth, something the. The step test response to a DC input pulse revealed very good time-alignment between the drivers, although the thirdorder crossovers do not permit true coherence. I set the Nautilus s up in my smaller listening room about cubic feet , placing them four feet out from the front wall. This arrangement gave me decent imaging and flattest overall response, though it somewhat reduced bass extension and impacta common trade-off in speaker placement. The s reproduction of music and voice was clean and wonderfully smooth. The treble reproduction was clean and without audible grain. With a pink-noise test signal, the Nautilus proved to have excellent horizontal and adequate vertical dispersion. As with many speakers, response off the vertical axis dipped at the crossover frequency about 3 kHz , but seated listeners will be on the vertical axis. The slightly editorialized the sound, which I attribute to a slight lower midrange excess and a dip in the upper midrange that I measured with both speakers working together in my room; I did not find the speaker to be as transparent in the midrange as it was in the treble, being a bit too polite British? In the treble, however, the Nautilus definitely outclassed the Paradigms, which tended to have a bit more bite on horns than the horns themselves did. For most of my listening, I used the speakers full-range, driven either by one amplifier or by two separate amps, one feeding the woofer and the other the tweeter terminals of the speaker's crossover passive biamp mode. In my cubic-foot room, they could play loud enough to satisfy me. On occasion, I did hear some glare in the midrange on difficult orchestral material, but only at levels a. I also tried using the Nautilus 's with various subwoofers and cross overs. This combination let me take advantage of the 's strengths, while getting low-distortion bass down into the twenties, and improved the dynamics by increasing headroom generally 4 dB, according to speaker designers I've spoken to. So this combination is more of academic than of practical interest, unless you plan to use the Nautilus 's in a den or as part of a home theater, where there's too little space for big, full-range speakers. The Audio Critics longstanding policy for testing speakers is to combine objective measurements with several listening evaluations, preferably by at least two experienced listeners in at least two different rooms. The laboratory's measurements were taken on a single speaker, quasianechoically to factor out room effects. On-axis frequency response was pretty flat up to about 2. With the conventionally prescribed equilateral triangle listening setup, listeners would be 30 off axis, where response should show some of the elevated treble seen on axis. These are definitely not speakers to toe in so they directly face you. At 45 above axis, the crossover dip extended from 1. Bass response was smooth and free of peaks, pretty close to the classic fourth-order Butterworth response, with a tuning frequency of about 37 Hz. The Nautilus 's impedance does not fall dangerously low; it reaches a minimum of 4. Most amps can handle that, but it would make some marginal amplifiers uncomfortable. Distortion was reasonably, but not spectacularly, low. At a 1-meter SPL of 90 dB,. That's pretty normal performance for a minimonitor. Next, we auditioned the Nautilus 's in The Audio Critics large listening room, which is less well damped than my room and whose listening position is twice as distant. I sug-. This improved things considerably, but neither Peter Aczel nor I were enthralled, and I commented that this performance was much less satisfying than it had been in my quarters. The 's sounded dynamically compressed on operatic recordings. The midrange sounded a bit ragged,. It was no comparison: All in all, I would call the Nautilus a qualified success. It is beautiful in design and construction, carefully engineered, and without significant measurable vices. It can deliver fine sound with small signals, but others in its class can deliver such sound at higher volumes. It has improved drivers, crossover, and bracing, as well as new finishes. Certainly, the driver and crossover improvements may well improve performance in the areas we found challenged in the original, and we would welcome a chance to assess the new version. The Nautilus is recommended, but with qualifications due to its dynamic limitations and lack of ultimate transparency. It may well be your cup of tea; it just wasn't ours. Those are the main, but not the only, differences between the models. Bose was the first company I know of to address the fact that high- and low-frequency noise pose separate problems, and provide separate solutions for each. For the low frequencies, Bose employs active cancellation: Using builtin microphones to pick up the noise, the phones invert the noise signal's polarity and feed it to the transducers in its earcups. Within the earcups,. For higher frequencies, however, cancellation is not practical, because of the shorter wavelengths and, perhaps, higher processing speed involved. In an airliner, headphones that reduce only low-frequency engine noise merely make it easier to hear annoying conversations in other rows. But high frequencies are easier to block than low frequencies. To block them, both the old and new Bose's earcups have hard shells and nonporous cushions that form a good seal against continued on page Tested sample on loan from manufacturer. Music shouldn't have to compete with noise but it always does. In our homes, where it's reasonably quiet, the competition isn't too fierce. But music is so portable these days that we take it with us to noisy places such as airliners. If we want to hear the music, we'd better quash the noise. Bose's original solution to this problem, the QuietComfort headphones, made a good impression on me from the first flight I took with them. They fit comfortably, sounded good, and did a terrific job of keeping ambient noise from competing with the music they were reproducing. Bose's new model, the QuietComfort 2, does all that a little better and a lot more conveniently. AudioControl has always represented no-nonsense engineering and solid value, untainted by either "tweako" cultism or el cheapo massmarketingour kind of manufacturer. Issue No. The two amplifiers under review here appear to be identical, except for 1 the number of channels and 2 the beefier power supply and fatter chassis of the 5-channel model. For that reason, I only tested a couple of channels out of the available 7, under the reasonable assumption that my measurements and conclusions will apply to both models and therefore all 7 channels equally. The two amplifiers are well built; they even possess a certain degree of cosmetic polish, such as we are accustomed to from AudioControl. But of course they are totally lacking in highend affectations such as half-inch thick sculptured front panels and fancy carrying handles. The amplifier operates in Class H; this is a somewhat unusual configuration, based on tiered voltage rails. The 80 to dB min ima for distortion at the lower fre that permit low current draw with. I have no sup porting data. The various output status lights are con solidated in a handsome large win dow. All in all, it's a pretty slick design. The most basic measurement of any power amplifier is distortion ver sus output power at various frequen cies. The channels I tested were vir tually identicaland not particularly impressive, distortionwise. Into a load of 8, clipping occurred just above watts, but this was not the point of minimum distortion as is the case where the distortion is completely noise-dominated. With a 1 kHz input, the distortion curve bottomed out at 16 watts and again at 67 watts, at. The center 0 line shows performance into purely re sistive loads; the others show performance into increasingly reactive loads, capacitive loads to the left and reactive loads to the right. The vertical scale shows output voltage. Output into 8-ohm loads is just as it should be, but power slopes off rapidly at lower im pedances, a sign of power-supply limitations. The power dropoff with reactive loads of 4 ohms or less shows that such loads trigger the amplifier's current limiting. See text. Lowering the loads to 2 greatly exaggerated this anomaly and when it came to 1. Maybe a qualified one. These units aren't exactly cheap, but they are physically attractive and compact packages, and into 8 loads their performance is basically flawless. If you have speakers whose imped ance tends to dip low and turn highly reactive at various frequencies, then there exist better choices in amplifiers. Since the majority of speakers have a nominal impedance of 8, the AudioControl amplifiers can certainly be recommended to drive them. A more sweeping. Only a couple of high-end Sony players I have tested in the past were its equal in that respect, exhibiting no gain-related analog distortion at full scale 0 dB , among other things. Filipina lesbian peeing. Free long cumshot. Dildo harness comptible. Nacked ladies with big boobs. Dildo pussy ass gif. Blonde threesome with 2 guys. Teenage girls volleyball shorts. Crying mexican girl fucked. Random Gallary Girls partying passing out nude. Nude havertown pa woman. Sexy hot long legs. Clit piecing video. Home toy teens fuck. Porn body painting girl. Sex Dating. New Pics Tanning bed hand bra Girl guy straight threesome two Maxillo facial and oral surgeon Chat gay latino mt tb. All models on www. All galleries and links are provided by 3rd parties. At the same event, General Motors entered the prototype of its electric vehicle, the EV1, which the company raced against another amp-hungry maniac: Roderick Wilde, a tall, bearded, long-haired, leather-clad figure who looks more like a biker gang member than a race-car driver. In fact, he rides a big Suzuki motorcycle, and sometimes wears a black beret with "Born to be Wilde" hand-embroidered around the edge. Wilde had already racked up his own string of dubious achievements. We went so fast they eliminated our race class because it was too dangerous. At the drag races, Wilde adds, "the announcer got my name wrong and the name of my car wrong, but I beat GM's car by two whole seconds. The three of them discussed creating their own affiliation: A whole new racing category now exists for the "amp suckers. And I decided to check them out. Forty miles south of Portland I take the Woodburn exit from I-5 and follow a two-lane blacktop across flat wheat fields punctuated with barns and old wooden farmhouses. After a couple of miles I find the Woodburn Dragstrip: Today, Friday, a marquee-style sign outside the strip proclaims "Street-legal drags. The electronerds aren't scheduled till tomorrow - but some of them are turning up anyway. The navy blue racer is decorated with spiffy electric-discharge patterns in special reflective paint. He's suntanned, amiable, low-key, without the edge that you'd expect from a speed maniac. In fact his modest manner and large-lensed glasses make him look like a clerical worker - although the appearance is deceptive. I'd tweak them and soup up the motors, race against other kids in the neighborhood - and take their cars home with me. His first real car was a '65 Buick Grandsport, which he raced in suburban Connecticut. The cops would be there, but there were too many of us for them to do much about it. We'd make the windows rattle on the McDonald's. You could get octane Sunoco back then, for 29 cents a gallon. One night, when he was driving alone, a couple of patrol cars pursued him. I made a turn onto a side street, but at the end of it was an entrance to a football field, with two steel posts. I had my lights off, and I ran right into both those posts. They mashed both my fenders, all the way up to my doors. I was just jammed in there and couldn't get out, and the cops arrived and started laughing at me. They'd given me tickets before for speeding and reckless driving. After that I wasn't allowed to drive for four years, so I went into the Air Force. I repaired their welder in five minutes and talked to the guy for three hours about an electric dragster. I said, 'Let's do it! I have 28 batteries, giving volts at 1, amps. The cables are about an inch in diameter. There's less maintenance and no tune-ups, and after each race a recharge from his portable generator costs about 30 cents. I ask him how the car feels when he takes off. I cover the first 60 feet in 1. You feel the acceleration pull your face back. I do one-eighth of a mile in 6 seconds, reaching mph. The last eighth, the performance falls off because I have no transmission. So, this is the right thing to do - for ecology, and to get kids interested in the whole idea. Well, all right! I squeeze into the seat, scraping my knees on the aluminum body and bumping my head on the roll bar. Don't even think of touching it. That would initiate the race sequence. I imagine myself fumbling for it as the car winds up and shoots toward the chain-link perimeter fence feet away. Probably I could hit the switch around the same time the car hit the fence. Still, this is no time to wimp out. I press it, and the car rolls forward. There's no suspension, so I feel every crack in the asphalt. The dragster makes an electric grinding noise, like an old-fashioned streetcar. The "pit area" at Woodburn is a desolate expanse like an abandoned parking lot. Finally I wrestle it back to his trailer. Electronerds race machines crammed full of batteries that deliver surges of power up to 1, amps. A couple hours later the gas-guzzlers arrive: The race fee is only 20 bucks, and you can make as many runs down the track as time permits. I walk among the cars as they line up with their engines rumbling, while the drivers' girlfriends sit on the bleachers eating corn dogs and drinking 7-Up. Then the racing starts, and it sounds as if tigers are being tortured here among the wheat fields. Screaming tires, roaring motors - it's a testosterone-fueled, head-hammering ritual as the drivers pair off like elks banging their antlers together at the start of the mating season. Bearing in mind that "knee trembler" was s Liverpudlian slang for a stand-up blow job, it's no surprise to see the vocabulary of fuel injection and blowers superchargers perverted in a dashboard sticker that reads, "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown. In fact, this event reeks even more of sublimated sex than of exhaust fumes - and the noise is an intrinsic element. He spins the fat tires to warm the rubber for better adhesion, and then - he's gone! His dragster drifts away like a bird on the breeze, easily outpacing his rival, a 5-liter behemoth that bellows futilely as it falls behind. The gasoline-car drivers look at each other as if to say, What the fuck? If a man with a high-powered rifle wandered into a primitive tribe where they'd been duking it out with wooden clubs, I imagine the reaction would be the same. The technology gap is so extreme, it makes the whole game seem pointless. The next day - Saturday - the gas-guzzlers are gone and the pit area is invaded by smart, hairy geeks swigging Evian water and chattering jargon like speed freaks. Every one of them is male, except for some wives and girlfriends. Yes, the electronerds are here - and the bleachers are empty. The event was listed in the track's calendar, but the locals have chosen to stay home. Still, there's no shortage of cars and drivers. Roderick Wilde's Maniac Mazda RX7 is a fearsome creation, crammed full of batteries and looking slightly beat-up, like a prize fighter with a history. John Wayland has brought his White Zombie, cranked to a higher voltage and plastered with slogans: Question internal combustion Plasma Boy Racing. The explosion generated a terrifying ball of blue plasma crackling with electric discharges. Not far away, Don Crabtree, a sewing-machine design engineer, stands by his record-breaking volt motorcycle powered by wheelchair batteries. I wander over to a red Toyota MR2, as shiny as if it just came out of a showroom. Its owner is Bob Boyd, a white-haired Air Force veteran. This is more fun. He retired 24 years ago, but at 78, he still loves speed and, like most electric racers, is a self-taught engineer. So, you learned to do it yourself..

Not all the vehicles are finished as meticulously as Boyd's, but most are good-looking and practical. They Tsakiridis amplifiers suck could Tsakiridis amplifiers suck conventional automobiles under many everyday conditions. Racing, though, may not be Tsakiridis amplifiers suck killer app that the advocates are looking for.

The cars move so silently, you can forget that anything's happening on the track. It's like an action movie with the sound turned off. Up in the control tower, I ask the track owner which of his events attracts the biggest crowd. His answer is no surprise: Most people want to see insanely powerful, nitro-fueled monsters read more shoot jets of flame out their pipes and make so much noise that you feel your internal organs vibrating in sympathy.

Electric-powered race cars have novelty value - maybe even shock value - among auto aficionados, but they remove fetish elements that are deeply embedded in car culture. When you suppress the animal growl of a hot rod and quench its stinking breath, you emasculate it - and the drama dies.

Yorkshire fuck Watch Vintage japanese milf Video Naked chubbys. Some of our readers still don't understand what kind of letter is likely to be published in this column. Zen hint to the intuitive: The Audio Critic: I hope Issue No. On top of that the tone of presentation makes it so much more readable than often in the past. In the introduction to "Speakers" page 15 , you point out that good speaker design is the sum of many, many aspects that were properly dealt with. I agree wholeheartedly, and also with your example of the Waveform Mach 17 speaker system. Yet this speaker, and all the ones that Floyd Toole referred to in the feature article, suffer from being caught in the box paradigm. The ultimate performance and accuracy of reproduction that can be achieved within this paradigm are limited, and the best of Toole's examples have reached that plateau. There are two fundamental problems with box speakers: The reradiation problem has been addressed to varying degrees of success by different designers. Constant power response, though, requires drivers and box features that decrease in size as frequency increases, to maintain wide and uniform polar response beyond what the speakers in Toole's article achieve. The result of failing to deal with these two problems is the typical, generic box-. Loudspeakers end up in rooms. The off-axis radiation therefore matters, as Toole's findings clearly point out, but 10 dB variation in power response is too much and limits this design approach. The improvement beyond it is via omnidirectional box speakers or full-range, open-baffle dipole speakers. Some planar electrostatic or magnetic designs show the potential of this approach, but ultimately they are limited by being acoustically too large at higher frequencies, yet having insufficient volume displacement for low-frequency reproduction at near realistic levels. These problems can be overcome with conventional dynamic drivers on open baffles. As it turns out, such speakers are significantly less sensitive to the room both below and above Hz. The "preservation of the art" problem, or the "circle of confusion," can only be resolved by using unamplified sound as a reference and not other loudspeakers. This will also point out the need to reduce nonlinear distortion and stored energy, which are at least equal in importance to the different steadystate frequency responses. He was a. Hewlett-Packard scientist before he started designing loudspeaker systems for Audio Artistry and Linkwitz Lab, all of which are based on the dipole principle. Thus the above letter is motivated by a designer's agenda, but that doesn't make it less valid. The arguments in favor of the dipole approach are powerful and not to be ignored. We wish we could test one of the Linkwitz-designed loudspeakers how about it, Siegfried? We listed you as one of the White Hats good guys of audio in Issue No. It's time for some hands-on. As for your favorable comments on our publication, they couldn't come from a more authoritative source and are therefore especially welcome. In response to Issue No. Toole colorblind? First picture: I've been painting for over 40 years and I never knew light could be measured in dB. As for the rest of your magazine, you've done better. As far as your plan to retire to a primarily supervisory position is concerned, just retire and let Ivan Berger take over. Your "Hip Boots" column is sorely missed because it keeps the crazy audio drivel in check. Don't give that up! Tom Nousaine's "Urban Audio Legends". You never knew that light could be measured in dB? Well, it seems there are lots of things you never knew, and this is one of them. A dB number can be just an expression of a ratio, e. Thus 3 dB too much red means 1. Your assumption that it's Floyd Toole, Ph. Now, about Issue No. When there are three or more of anything, one will be the best, one will be the least good, and the other s will be in between. That doesn't mean, however, that they aren't all good. Didn't it occur to you that it just might be more complicated than that? Thanks for all your concerns. I was truly delighted to find Issue No. It is so good to see that someone is still out there battling the fakes and frauds. Peter, you are my hero. See below. In your editorial you claim to be getting old and tired. But cheer up. What you are doing with The Audio Critic is such excellent work that it must go on. I have retired from the audio field after many years and am now, 10 years into. These are gardening, astronomy, and mineral collecting. Still, I think about audio matters very often and still do a bit of consulting in room acoustics and audio systems. I have taken the liberty of sending you a couple of photos of my listening room as it is now and has been for 22 years. I am still pleased with it and find no reason to change anything. It is now the music that counts for me. Very best regards and best wishes for future success. Greiner is Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, and one of my heroes, as our regular readers know. For quite a few decades before his retirement he embodied the academic community's most authoritative, and at the same time most genial, voice on the subject of audio. Talk about "battling the fakes and frauds"he was at all times in the font lines, patiently refuting charlatanry with irrefutable science. My admiration for him is unlimited, hence his frequent presence in this column. We may not have anything near the circulation of Stereophile, but could they ever, in a million years, have elicited a letter like the above from Dick Greiner? As for your music system and listening room, Dick, should I be surprised that you are not looking for a change? What, only eight monstrous woofers? Only 24 visible smaller drivers? Only a dozen electronic units? I have never seen a setup like yours, and very, very few 21st century rigs like it. It really amuses me when you say that only the music matters; it's like a Rolls Royce owner saying that, well, it's basic transportation. May you listen to that music in good health and spirits for many years to comeand thank you for your compliments. Hello Peter, I have come to praise you, not to bury you! Item One: I received the latest issue of The Audio Critic No. Your explanation as to the reason for the disintegration of your relationship with The CM Group caught my attention. Greg had not read your explanation as to what happened between you and The CM Group, so I read your explanation to him verbatim. Was I surprised at his response! He agreed with you completely! To be completely honest which is a much better form of honesty than partially honest! There wasn't. Not only did he agree with your explanation but spoke very highly of you! Son of a gun! It's somewhat humbling to admit I was wrong, but it would be a mortal sin not to admit so and apologize. Item Two: No need to tell you that I couldn't wait to read Mr. Wolverton's article. Fortunately, this time, the cultists were shown as believing? Much to my pleasant surprise, you and David Rich were quoted regarding the continued on page Our Last Column How come? By Ivan Berger, Guest D. Strauss, Contributing. Tested samples on loan from the manufacturer. A inch, side-mounted woofer in a full-range speaker this small? Not quite. It's something Definitive Technologies calls a "planar-technology pressure-driven subwoofer"in other words, a passive radiator sometimes called a PR, drone cone, auxiliary bass radiator, or flapping baffle. Typically, passive radiators substitute for vents, or ports, in small speakers designed to deliver substantial bass output. That's a good description of the StudioMonitor , a member of Definitive Technologies' "Monitor Series" of modestly priced home-theater loudspeakers. Using a ported cabinet instead of. It does this by coupling an acoustic resonant system the enclosure and a portusually a tubethat vents its output into the room to the rear of the speaker's diaphragm. This sets up an acoustic resonance between the mass of air moving in the port and the stiffness of the air in the enclosure. By matching the enclosure and port sizes to the characteristics of the driver, this resonator is typically tuned to a frequency near the lowest frequency the system is intended to reproduce, and radiates low frequencies over a range of roughly two-thirds of an octave around its resonance. If the system is properly designed, far more sound comes from the port within its operating range than from the driver. Because the ported enclosure's acoustic resonant system is typically more linear than the mechanical resonant system of the speaker, its distortion is lower. Below its resonance, unfortunately, the port's output is essentially out of phase with the loudspeaker's, which makes the system's bass output roll off much faster than that of an equivalent closed-box system. There is, however, a catch to all this: At high volume levels, the air in the vent can move fast enough to generate significant turbulence, which causes extraneous noise and limits the port's output. This turbulence can be tamed by increasing the port's area, but that calls for lengthening the port to increase the air mass within it. Otherwise, the box resonance, and hence the shape of the speaker's response curve, will change. For small boxes that are tuned to low frequencies and designed to radiate a lot of acoustic power, enlarging the port's mouth would call for very long port tubes that take up a lot of space in the box; sometimes, tubes that are long enough won't fit! Using a passive radiator sidesteps these problems. Typically, a passive radiator is a speaker frame, cone, surround, and sometimes spider without a magnet and voice coil. Here, the ported-box resonance is a function of the mass of the passive radiator and the compliance of the air trapped in the enclosure. Because it is shallow, the radiator can be made large enough to avoid turbulence while taking up hardly any space within the cabinet. And because the radiator's mass is in-. A properly designed passive radiator requires roughly two to four times the air-moving capability 1. Both active drivers are mounted on the front of the cabinet, with the tweeter on top and offset about an inch to one side. The speakers are provided in mirrorimage pairs, with black, white, or golden-cherry piano-gloss finishes on the top and bottom. The front, sides, and rear are covered in a wrap-around grille cloth, held in place by the removable top and bottom pieces. Connection is through a single pair of gold-plated multiway binding posts, spaced for double banana plugs, on the bottom rear of the cabinet. Cabinet construction is quite heavy-duty for a speaker system of this size and price: The cabinet is well braced and quite solid. The magnetically shielded, 1-inch aluminum-dome tweeter is essentially the same as that used in Definitive Technology's top-of-the-line systems. The inch passive radiator is simply a rigid circular plate with an attached surround. The SM 's crossover is wired on a small PC board mounted near the speaker's input cup and can be reached by removing the cup. The crossover, a second-order design, has an iron-. That's one more resistor and capacitor than usual; the extra components probably act as an impedance-compensating network. As in my previous reviews, I used two different test techniques to measure frequency responses. The test signal for these measurements was the usual 2. The on-axis response of the Studio Monitor is shown in Fig. Only the response with the grille on is shown, because the grille cloth is not designed to be removed; fortunately, the grille had essentially no effect on the SM 's response except for very small deviations of less than 0. The smoothed curve is quite well behaved and fits a tight 2. At higher frequencies, the unsmoothed curve exhibits a sharp dip of about 10 dB at At low frequencies, the system rolls off slowly, reaching -3 dB at 83 Hz, - 6 dB at 63 Hz, and - 9 dB at about 50 Hz which is near the SM 's vented-box resonance. Below 50 Hz, the system rolls off rapidly, about 24 dB per octave, as is common with vented-box systems. However, this curve was measured in free space,. The SM 's horizontal and vertical off-axis frequency responses are shown in Fig. Between 1 and 3 kHz the response shelves downward, the dip worsening as the offaxis angle is increased. There are also significant high-frequency aberrations above 8 kHz at extreme off-axis angles. These aberrations include a dip above 10 kHz, followed by a peak at about 13 kHz. That high-frequency dip and peak are also seen in the responses measured above and below the tweeter's axis. The above-axis curves Fig. Response below axis Fig. Between 3. This implies that these speakers should be aimed above ear level, or possibly be mounted upside down to provide the smoothest response for seated or standing listeners. Luckily, the cabinet bottoms are finished like the tops, although there are four small bumps that serve as feet. Unfortunately, the logos on front of the speakers are upside down when the speakers are inverted. The input impedance magnitude of the StudioMonitor Fig. The two impedance peaks that mark the as a vented box are clearly evident; the impedance minimum 3. The impedance phase Fig. The SM should be an easy load for any competent power amplifier or hometheater receiver. To measure the distortion of the Figs. In this setup, test signals generated by Igor are fed through the USBPre and my amplifier to the s, while signals from my test microphone are fed to the computer through the USBPre, then analyzed and plotted on graphs by Igor. The distortion was evaluated at each frequency by applying a sine wave to the system for one half second and then evaluating the harmonic distortion of the system's output, measuring the total energy of the 2nd through 5th harmonics by using FFT Fast Fourier Transform to compute the frequency spectrum of that output. Results are expressed as a percentage of the fundamental's signal level, not as a percentage of the total output. The harmonic distortion at each frequency was evaluated at three different power levels, 6 dB apart. At the power levels I used for this test, the distortion did not become irritating until the test frequency dropped below 45 Hz. The SM woofer's intermodulation distortion IM was measured with the same power levels and test conditions as in the harmonic distortion test but over a slightly different range of frequencies. For this test, I applied two tones of equal level, one fixed at Hz, the other varying from The dual-tone test signals were applied to the speaker for one half second each. The test results, expressed as a percentage of the energy of the two original test tones, represent the total energy of three intermodulation sidebands above and three below the higher test frequency. The IM Fig. For frequencies above Hz, the harmonic distortion percentage stays roughly constant and generally doubles when the input power does. Below Hz, the distortion reaches a maximum at about 70 Hz, falls to a. The dip in the vicinity of 50 Hz coincides with the system's ventedbox tuning frequency, where the passive radiator is producing most of the sound. As you can see from the slight shift in this dip when the power level changes, box tuning varies slightly with the test conditions; this is why the impedance measurement, above, indicates 55 Hz as the tuning frequency. At the highest power level, 25 watts, the maximum distortion is a. When I first unpacked the StudioMonitor s, I was quite impressed with their overall appearance, especially the cabinets' piano-black top and bottom panels. At first, I could not figure out how to get the grille cloth off so I could see the drivers, but I soon determined that the top and bottom panels could be removed, as they are attached to the cabinet with four pegs that engage holes in the panels. When a panel is removed, it uncovers the grille cloth, which is tightened around the cabinet with a captive drawstring. The grille wraps completely around the cabinet and has a cutout at the rear for the input-terminal cup. When uncovered, the speakers and cabinet had a meticulous, no-nonsense look that showed careful craftsmanship and attention to detail. Under the grille cloth, the enclosure was finished in an attractive satin black. The SM s are provided with wallmounting brackets that screw into routed-out holes on the rear panel a nice touch. The large passive radiator essentially takes up one whole side of the cabinet; in an enclosure this size, it looks like a monster woofer. The radiator is inset " to protect it from damage. When energized by highlevel sine waves, the speaker sounded quite clean down to 40 Hz, but distortion was audibly significant at lower frequencies. At the box tuning frequency, the woofer's motion almost ceased and the passive radiator's excursion became quite large. The deep null in the woofer's excursion showed that the box and the passive radiator work extremely well. At and near the system's tuning frequency, maximum clean excursion was about 0. The effective radiating diameter of the passive radiator is about 8. This makes the drone cone's radiating area approximately 2. As I said above, this is good design practice for a passive-radiator system. For my listening, I placed the systems on 24" stands which raised the tweeter to about 34" above the floor about 7 feet apart and well away from room's side walls. The LED level monitors on my power amplifier showed that the amp was working noticeably less hard when driving the SM s. The SM s performed admirably on recordings with high peak content, which profit from high playback levelsbig-band material with prominent brass sections and drum rim shots, for example. With the peakexercising special effects on Ein Straussfest Telarc CDone of my favorites, even though it dates back to ! However, when I got carried away with the volume control on some of the Telarc CD's very loud low-bass passages, I could overload the s severely. The s' bass response was quite adequate on most of the material I listened to. On shaped tone bursts, bass response was quite acceptable down to 50 Hz, with usable output at 40 Hzbut not at lower frequencies. Teaming the s up with a subwoofer improved the sound significantly, putting the s on a more equal footing with the much larger s. On well-recorded female vocals, the s did exhibit some slight uppermidrange irregularities, but on highfrequency sibilants they did quite well, reproducing them without harshness, strain, or spittiness. After my lab tests revealed high-frequency response aberrations caused by the tweeter resonance mentioned earlier, I listened to the speakers again, but could hear no problems caused by this. Although my hearing, at this point, is rolled off in the range of this resonance, I sometimes can detect the subharmonics of such resonances. The s were the full equal of the s on male speaking voices. With the speakers turned upside down, the sound heard from a standing position matched the on-axis sound more closely. Differences were much less evident with music than with pink noise. The imaging and soundstaging of the s were excellent. Mono center images were quite stable and did not shift when the recording's frequency content changed. The s did extremely well on classical a cappella choral music, reproducing the voices and the room's reverberant sound with great precision. Considering their reasonable price, good looks, and great sound, I highly recommend the Definitive Technology StudioMonitor speakers for stereo use or for a home theater setup. With a competent subwoofer, they provide real competition for many much larger systems. Their high sensitivity and smooth response will be welcome in any music system. Don Keele. Genelec Inc. Tested samples on loan from manufacturer. No audio component is perfect, and speakers are the least perfect of all. The imperfections of other components can be too small for anyone to hear, but speakersall of themhave readily audible deficiencies. The virtue of "active," or powered, speakers is that their electronics can make those defects far less audible: Dedicated electronic equalizers can minimize the speaker's frequency-response errors. Built-in amplifiers can provide the exact power that the speaker or, better yet, each driver requires and, if each driver is powered separately, precise active crossovers can be employed instead of cruder, passive ones. What's more, protective circuitry can be custom-tailored to the drivers it safeguards. Despite their obvious potential for. Why buy power again? The complexity of modern audio and home theater systems may change that. In the days of stereo, all you needed was a record player, a tuner, a tape deck, a preamplifier, and a stereo power amplifier, plus five shelves to hold everything. Today, you might have seven source components, a preamplifier, satellite receiver, and an equalizer well, I do. Who has rack space for an additional seven or eight channels' worth of amplifiers? I sure don't. So I use active speakers throughout my 7. Genelec is a fairly new name in the consumer market, but this Finnish company's active speakers are highly regarded and widely used in pro sound, where active speakers have long been common. Now, the company is angling for consumer sales, with several series of active home-theater speakers. The HT is the larger two-way speaker system in the Intimate Home Theater series there's also a three-way system , recommended for rooms of 3, to 4, cubic feet; other series are designed for rooms of under 3,, 5, to 10,, and over 10, cubic feet. The line also includes an in-wall model and two subwoofers. The HT has a inch woofer, which is unusual in a two-way speaker. The primary reason you don't see. Passive crossovers can have little or no influence on directivity, especially while retaining smooth response off axis. Better-performing satellites use 6- or 6-inch woofers at most, because such drivers are the largest ones capable of offering both a reasonable low-frequency extension and a woofer directivity that closely matches the tweeter's near the crossover 1. With electronic crossovers the designer can play a few little trade-off games regarding directivity; in the case of the HT, however, the excellent directivity over the entire operating range from 42 Hz to 22 kHz, despite the comparatively large woofer, appears to be due to the shallow, hornlike "Directivity Control Waveguide" surrounding the tweeter. The HT has two internal amplifiers: Genelec doesn't say what the hell "short-term" watts are, but who cares? Amplifier power ratings for active speakers powered subwoofers included have no signif-. We need to know how much energy comes out of the speaker, not how much energy goes in to produce that output. Of course, if manufacturer X gets dB SPL with a 2,watt amplifier and manufacturer Y does it with 20 watts, I might prefer the latter because it's easier on my electric bill. An "Autostart" function turns the unit off if no signal has been present for 5 minutes, but restarts it immediately when a new signal is received. Additional controls on the rear panel wouldn't remote controls be cool? Units currently in production have two additional features: Users will be able to select whether the LEDs remain off, show only yellow for standby and green for operation, or also show red for overload. The speaker is magnetically shielded, so you can use it near a TV set or other cathode-ray tube CRT display. The HT is relatively large for a satellite speaker. With its bass response specified as Although it has a small, 1-foot-square footprint, the cabinet occupies 2. However, HTs are now available in glossy piano black and three wood-veneer finishes, all complete with grilles prices not established at press time. As I did not have the grilles, I could. The tweeter waveguide plate can be removed and rotated 90 so the Genelec logo will be upright if you mount the speaker horizontally. The electronics panel on the rear is resiliently mounted, a pro-sound carryover that protects the system against rough handling on tour. The enclosure seems relatively tourproof, too: How did the Genelec HT measure up? Let's discuss how it performed in the lab first. Basic measurements were taken at 2 meters in my large, 7,cubic-foot, room; maximum output for a stereo-arrayed pair was measured at 4 meters in the same room. The horizontal response graph Fig. Directly on axis, its response fits in a 3 dB window from 55 Hz to 20 kHz, shelved up by approximately 2 dB between 1 and 10 kHz. Horizontal directivity is remarkably smooth and wide. This is not due to some kind of electronic trickery; there is no suggestion to that effect in Genelec's specs and literature. As it is most unusual for a inch two-way system to work this well off axis, the explanation probably lies, as I suggested earlier, in the shallow, hornlike baffle "Directivity Control Waveguide" of the tweeter. Vertical radiation patterns Fig. Below the axis, there's a sharp, deep notch at 1. Above-axis response is smooth to about 20, with notching near the crossover frequency as the angle increases. These problems are common when multiway speakers have drivers placed side by side or when vertically arrayed systems are used horizontally. I beg people with multiple listening seats to use a vertically arrayed center channel. The HT should be used vertically whenever possible, and when used for a center channel should preferably be placed below the screen. For example, the DIP switch for Bass Roll-Off a highpass filter whose slope increases from 6 to 12 dB per octave in small steps indicates cuts of 2, 4, 6, and 8 dB for frequencies below Hz, but setting the switch at -8 dB only cut response by only a little more than 5 dB. Likewise, the Bass Tilt switch which should cut 2, 4, or 6 dB below 1 kHz, depending upon its setting produced a 4 dB reduction when set in the -6 dB position. The tweeter and woofer can be turned off individually when the Mute position on the driver's DIP switch is selectedwhile this is a fantastic feature for nearfield measuring it is of no use I can think of for home listening. For a two-way satellite, the HT delivered a healthy output, though not quite as healthy as suggested by Genelec's specification dB peak per pair at 1 meter, with music. The HT's low-frequency abilities were similar to those of many "fullrange" floor-standing loudspeakers I've used. Speakers seldom have the lowfrequency dynamic capability that reference measurement levels imply. Frequently, full-range models whose measured low-frequency extension seems impressive exhibit an upward spectral balance shift at high output. To measure the Genelec's low-frequency abilities, I used a technique adopted from Don Keele: I fed the speaker ramped, 6. This is because the speaker is just leaving its linear output range at that point; as the level increases further, distortion will begin increasing exponentially. Surprisingly few two-way satellites or even full-range speakers can deliver such usable output at 40 Hz. However, the HT's usable output at 40 Hz was nearly 25 dB below its maximum clean output at higher frequencies, which occasionally caused the spectral balance shift described previously. If you want full-bandwidth dynamic capability, you'll need to use the Genelec with a subwoofer. I listened to the HT as a stereo pair. The sound was clean and clear, although somewhat aggressive. With the Treble Tilt switch set to 0 dB, there was excessive sibilance when playing Suzanne Vega's recording of "Tom's Diner" on Solitude Standing and percussion sounded somewhat overemphasized. When I set the Treble Tilt switch to -4 dB, however, voices and acoustic instruments were rendered with natural timbre and excellent detail and clarity, although the speaker still sounded slightly aggressive. The Genelecs delivered a wide, moderately deep soundstage, with excellent image placement and separation. Dynamically, the H T 2 1 0 plays damn loud, yet retains its clarity when the music gets soft or is simply played softly. There is some, but less than usual, upward spectral shift when playing full-range recordings at very loud levels. When played at full gain with ultraloud, dynamic, or ultracompressed program material Radiohead's Amnesiac, Fugees' Blunted on Reality, Jay Leonhart's Salamander Pie the H T 2 1 0 could play roughly 3 dB beyond its clean limit. At such high levels, the Genelec's limiters keep turning on and off and the sound is sometimes grossly distorted. I used hearing protection when checking this. But when you're finished abusing the speaker, there will be no burned or bottomed voice coils, and the system will play as if it were still new. The Genelec HT will reward any listener with high-quality, highoutput playback in mono, stereo, and multichannel music and film systems. It has more output capability than any other two-way home system I've ever used, and more than many inch towers. As a satellite speaker, it's a little on the large side. As a full-range speaker, it's moderate in size but with the impact of many larger floor-standing systems. Like all satellite and most full-range systems it will benefit from a subwoofer if you like high-impact low-frequency programs. As far as I'm concerned, these Genelecs would be welcome in my house anytime. Tom Nousaine. Model CS1. The CS1. That look is part of Thiel's "Coherent Source" design, which, the company says, aims to eliminate "time and phase distortions that cause alterations in the reproduced musical waveforms of most loudspeakers. The front panel is claimed to reduce parasitic resonances, and its rounded corners minimize diffraction. Thiel also uses widebandwidth drivers and true, first-order crossovers to maintain phase coherence. The result, says Thiel, is enhanced realism, clarity, transparency and immediacy, as well as improved imaging and a deeper soundstage. The woofer's construction is unusual. Instead of placing a small voice coil at the apex of a deep woofer cone, Thiel gave the CS1. This design distributes the driving force over a larger area and, by reducing the unsupported span between the coil and the cone's edge, re-. According to Thiel, it also moves the diaphragm's spurious resonances to a much higher frequency, and hence raises the driver's high-frequency cutoff. As a result of this driving system, the woofer's cone is quite shallow and its dustcap is distinctively large. The large voice coil enables Thiel to place the neodymium magnet inside the pole piece rather than outside it. This topology provides magnetic shielding; when I set a CS1. The woofer's extended response is a necessity, because of the CS1. The virtues claimed for first-order crossovers, which have gentle slopes of 6 dB per octave, are simple construction typically, one capacitor and one inductor and "phase coherence" the elimination of phase changes at the crossover frequency. The theory is that a first-order crossover keeps the two drivers in quadrature 90 apart at all frequencies, and consequently the sum of the two drivers' acoustic outputs is theoretically a perfect replica of the crossover's input. Porn body painting girl. Sex Dating. New Pics Tanning bed hand bra Girl guy straight threesome two Maxillo facial and oral surgeon Chat gay latino mt tb. All models on www. All galleries and links are provided by 3rd parties. We have no control over the content of these pages. We take no responsibility for the content on any website which we link to, please use your own discretion while surfing the porn links. Choking free abuse porn. Hand job stories motorcycle. Big cock tranny and men. Maintaining erections with multiple orgasms. Porn anal gang bangs. Crocreview riley ray facial. Women fuck little boys. Biggest tits wet t shirt. Position to lick pussy. Naked pussy licked boy. Ass female hole lick. Probably I could hit the switch around the same time the car hit the fence. Still, this is no time to wimp out. I press it, and the car rolls forward. There's no suspension, so I feel every crack in the asphalt. The dragster makes an electric grinding noise, like an old-fashioned streetcar. The "pit area" at Woodburn is a desolate expanse like an abandoned parking lot. Finally I wrestle it back to his trailer. Electronerds race machines crammed full of batteries that deliver surges of power up to 1, amps. A couple hours later the gas-guzzlers arrive: The race fee is only 20 bucks, and you can make as many runs down the track as time permits. I walk among the cars as they line up with their engines rumbling, while the drivers' girlfriends sit on the bleachers eating corn dogs and drinking 7-Up. Then the racing starts, and it sounds as if tigers are being tortured here among the wheat fields. Screaming tires, roaring motors - it's a testosterone-fueled, head-hammering ritual as the drivers pair off like elks banging their antlers together at the start of the mating season. Bearing in mind that "knee trembler" was s Liverpudlian slang for a stand-up blow job, it's no surprise to see the vocabulary of fuel injection and blowers superchargers perverted in a dashboard sticker that reads, "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown. In fact, this event reeks even more of sublimated sex than of exhaust fumes - and the noise is an intrinsic element. He spins the fat tires to warm the rubber for better adhesion, and then - he's gone! His dragster drifts away like a bird on the breeze, easily outpacing his rival, a 5-liter behemoth that bellows futilely as it falls behind. The gasoline-car drivers look at each other as if to say, What the fuck? If a man with a high-powered rifle wandered into a primitive tribe where they'd been duking it out with wooden clubs, I imagine the reaction would be the same. The technology gap is so extreme, it makes the whole game seem pointless. The next day - Saturday - the gas-guzzlers are gone and the pit area is invaded by smart, hairy geeks swigging Evian water and chattering jargon like speed freaks. Every one of them is male, except for some wives and girlfriends. Yes, the electronerds are here - and the bleachers are empty. The event was listed in the track's calendar, but the locals have chosen to stay home. Still, there's no shortage of cars and drivers. Roderick Wilde's Maniac Mazda RX7 is a fearsome creation, crammed full of batteries and looking slightly beat-up, like a prize fighter with a history. John Wayland has brought his White Zombie, cranked to a higher voltage and plastered with slogans: Question internal combustion Plasma Boy Racing. The explosion generated a terrifying ball of blue plasma crackling with electric discharges. Not far away, Don Crabtree, a sewing-machine design engineer, stands by his record-breaking volt motorcycle powered by wheelchair batteries. I wander over to a red Toyota MR2, as shiny as if it just came out of a showroom. Its owner is Bob Boyd, a white-haired Air Force veteran. This is more fun. He retired 24 years ago, but at 78, he still loves speed and, like most electric racers, is a self-taught engineer. So, you learned to do it yourself. Kids who grow up around farms are pretty handy with tools. He consulted John Wayland before tackling his project, then spent about 18 months working on it. So, I built this for fun. It draws up to 1, amps from 16 batteries, volts. To recharge it, I just plug it into a standard volt outlet. Boyd's car is immaculately executed; the only clue that it's not a regular Toyota is the electric plug hiding where a gas filler pipe should be. Boyd financed the conversion without any sponsors. So, I took a pretty nice car and tore it up, converted it. You could do the same thing a lot cheaper. His maximum range is 40 miles between recharges, but he feels this is perfectly adequate. Why don't they drive an electric? It's a whole bunch cheaper, like burning fuel at 14 cents a gallon. And of course it's nonpolluting. But the open combustion of coal or natural gas in power stations is inherently more efficient than an internal combustion engine, which creates noxious gases and a huge amount of waste heat. Also, as Boyd points out, hydroelectric power produces no pollutants at all. Therefore, electric vehicles really do have the potential to reduce emissions nationwide. Also, if millions of Americans went electric, existing power plants might still satisfy the demand, because most recharging would be done at night, when the load is lowest. I question Boyd about the valuable metals locked up inside batteries. In response, he claims that the modern lead-acid batteries used in almost all amateur car conversions are 95 percent recyclable. When I talk to other builders at the event, they give me the same well-practiced pro-electric sales pitch - and it's persuasive. Not all the vehicles are finished as meticulously as Boyd's, but most are good-looking and practical. They really could replace conventional automobiles under many everyday conditions. Racing, though, may not be the killer app that the advocates are looking for. The cars move so silently, you can forget that anything's happening on the track. It's like an action movie with the sound turned off. Up in the control tower, I ask the track owner which of his events attracts the biggest crowd. His answer is no surprise: Most people want to see insanely powerful, nitro-fueled monsters that shoot jets of flame out their pipes and make so much noise that you feel your internal organs vibrating in sympathy. Electric-powered race cars have novelty value - maybe even shock value - among auto aficionados, but they remove fetish elements that are deeply embedded in car culture. When you suppress the animal growl of a hot rod and quench its stinking breath, you emasculate it - and the drama dies. Electric dragsters seem unlikely to grab much airtime on ESPN. They can still serve an important function, though, because auto racing has always been a test bed for new technologies that eventually find their way into consumer products. Roderick Wilde claims he once met a Ford engineer who had been sent by his company to check out EVs at racing events for the past several years, looking for adaptable ideas. I certainly believe that the same thing can happen in electric vehicles. One day, maybe; but not yet. Auto manufacturers lag far behind the amateurs in terms of performance, price, and practicality see "Big Automakers vs. Backyard Mechanics," page , probably because the manufacturers don't believe a viable market for electric cars exists. Wayland's tricked-out Datsun will have 1, watts of audio. Toyota and General Motors have made the most serious investments, but Toyota spokesperson Jeremy Barnes freely admits that "we're not expecting to make a profit from EVs. We're working on getting the cost curve down. This is a bizarre situation. Amateurs are building affordable electrics, while huge corporations seem unwilling or unable to do so. The reason is simple: Manufacturers are obsessed with maximizing the distance an EV can travel between recharges..

Tsakiridis amplifiers suck dragsters seem unlikely to grab much airtime on ESPN. Lil mary lil mary gets ass creamed mobile porn. How a bunch of speed-hungry, rubber-burning, adrenaline-pumped environmentalists get their kicks. I'm cruising with John "Plasma Boy" Wayland, who has allowed me to drive his Tsakiridis amplifiers suck mint '72 "Blue Meanie" Datsun fitted with a watt sound system and count 'em 13 state-of-the-art Optima Yellow Top volt batteries.

I mash Tsakiridis amplifiers suck pedal. Tires squeal and I get that kicked-in-the-ass feeling as the Datsun leaps see more, ready to do 0 to 60 in around nine seconds. Eerily, there's no roar from the engine and no smoke from the tailpipe. In fact the Datsun has no tailpipe, because those volt batteries don't just run the stereo - they power the entire car. The Optima batteries Wayland Tsakiridis amplifiers suck didn't exist five years ago; nor did the solid-state controller that moderates their see more in the same way a dimmer controls a halogen lamp.

Modern controllers can handle huge surges of power - up to 1, amps at volts in the Datsun. That's 10 times the wattage a typical home would consume with all its lights burning and every appliance running. But Wayland isn't into power for its own sake; he has a profoundly ambitious agenda. In collaboration with a core group of renegade backyard engineers, he believes he can achieve the goal that has eluded ecofreaks for more than two decades. By rethinking the whole concept of electric cars and presenting them as sexy consumer items, ultimately he hopes to entice millions of Americans to abandon their long love affair with gasoline-powered automobiles.

But environmentally conscious link deal in guilt and want us to feel bad. I don't accept that. I say, build an electric car that is exciting and fun and gets your Tsakiridis amplifiers suck pumping, and Tsakiridis amplifiers suck people will want electric cars.

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His tactics haven't made him popular. Anna Cornell of the Electric Auto Association, which has been promoting electric vehicles sincesounds vexed and edgy when Wayland's name is mentioned. In fact Wayland has been pissing off environmental special-interest groups for more than 15 years.

Back inat an electric-car rally, he recalls, "I was in my gleaming, beautiful vehicle Tsakiridis amplifiers suck the stereo cranking, and they said, 'Wait - what are you doing here? They said, 'Where Tsakiridis amplifiers suck your batteries? I mean - it's supposed to look article source a car.

Adding outrage to insult, Wayland demonstrated the low-end torque of his DC motor by smoking his tires, choking spectators with localized air pollution. The ecofreaks were not amused.

Sexcontact overijssel Watch Nude beach college selfies tumblr Video Saxsi Video. Maximum radiation vertically appeared to be roughly aligned with a point about one-third the way down from the top of the cylindrical cage. The lateral direction and height coincide with the supposed radiating direction and vertical location of the system's tweeter. There was no way to get into the driver cage and check my hunch. The Ohm's frequency response at various horizontal angles is shown two ways: Consider "inside" as the direction from either speaker of a stereo pair toward a centered listener, and "outside" as the direction from the speaker to the room's nearer side wall. Figure 2a shows response from 90 outside to 90 inside in 30 steps, plus a 45 inside curve that corresponds to the direction of strongest response. The symmetry of the response curves around this 45 curve is clearly evident. The 30, 45, and 60 inside curves essentially lie one on top of the other, which indicates excellent directional uniformity. Note that the 0 and 90 inside. Outboard of the 0 straight-ahead curve, there is substantial high-frequency rolloff above 1 kHz, increasing with the angle. This, and the fact that the main response axis is toed in at 45, help make early reflections from the room walls less troublesome. But between 0 and 90 inside, coverage is quite uniform. As far as smoothness and spectral balance are concerned, the 30, 45, and 60 inside curves are quite well behaved, except for a slight uptilt in high-frequency response above 14 kHz and a moderate depression in the midrange response between about Hz and 3 kHz. However, such directionindependent response anomalies are easy to handle with appropriate equalization. The speaker's sensitivity, averaged from Hz to 4 kHz, was 84 dB; that's 3 dB less than specified by Ohm, primarily because the depression in the system's output between Hz and 3 kHz happened to roughly coincide with my sensitivity measurement span. Right-left matching was good; the right and left speakers agreeing within 1. The grille of the Mk-2 had minimal effect on response. Figure 2b shows the directional response of the Ohm Walsh over the full audible frequency range. I chose this method of display rather than the usual horizontal off-axis "waterfall" display because it makes the Ohm's radiation pattern more understandable. The vertical. Positive angles are to the inside, negative angles to the outside. The horizontal axis displays frequency, from 20 Hz to 20 kHz. The display has been normalized to the 45 inside frequency response, the direction of the strongest radiation; this is equivalent to making measurements after the speaker's frequency response has been equalized to be flat at an inside angle of The top left " - 1 " curve shows, for example, that the Ohm's response is down 1 dB at an inside angle of for frequencies from about 50 to Hz. Levels at intermediate points can be read from the color coding, which is explained by the color scale at the bottom left of the graph. Now that we have this fancy colored graph, what does it all mean? If you take slices of the graph along the frequency horizontal axis at a particular angle relative to the speaker's axis, you'll see the speaker's frequency response at that angle. If you take slices of the display along the angle vertical axis at a particular frequency, you'll see the Ohm's lateral polar response at that particular angle. If a speaker were omnidirectional in the horizontal plane at all frequencies, the entire graph would be yellow. If the speaker radiated sound only to 45 on either side of its axis, but had a perfect directional radiation pattern between those two angles, the graph would show a horizontal yellow bar that rapidly changed to red and then black at angles beyond This would mean that, within 45, the speaker had flat frequency response at every horizontal angle, or precisely even horizontal coverage at each frequency. Of course, real-world loudspeakers are not this well-behaved. Getting back to the Ohm Walsh Mk-2, Fig. Horizontal off-axis frequency response contour plot response normalized to the response at 45 inside ; see text. In the range from 0 to 90 inside, the response is very uniform over the whole frequency range the graph is mostly yellow in this range. The speaker is clearly omnidirectional below 1 kHz, but above that frequency its output is pretty much restricted to the range from straight ahead 0 to 90 inside. Shown in Figs. Above-axis response Fig. To check Ohm's claim that the Walsh Mk-2 preserves waveforms, I measured the speaker's phase and group delay responses at the 45 inside horizontal angle. For both measurements, I set the receive delay of my analyzer to coincide with the arrival of the tweeter's signal, which flattens the phase response above 5 kHz, primarily in the tweeter's frequency range. The measured phase response Fig. If it were, its phase response would be flat and near 0 over the whole frequency range, assuming its amplitude response was also reasonably flat. However, the Ohm's phase rotates only by about from 20 Hz to 20 kHz, much less than in typical two- or three-way speakers. The group delay Fig. Above Hz, the average group delay varies only by about us 0. The irregularities in the group delay are directly due to bumpiness in the amplitude response the "45" curve in Fig. Although the phase and group delay re-. Interestingly, the Ohm Walsh driver's output at middle and low frequencies leads the tweeter's output, rather than lagging behind as it would in most two- or three-way directradiator speakers. Spatially, this is an offset of about 2. Figures 6a and 6b show the Mk2's input impedance magnitude and phase from 20 Hz to 20 kHz. The impedance magnitude drops to a low of 3. The Ohm Walsh should be an easy load for any power amplifier or home-theater receiver. Below 20 Hz not shown in either graph the Mk-2's impedance magnitude continually rises as frequency is lowered and the phase approaches a constant angle of This indicates that a capacitor is in series with the input of the system, which I verified with an ohmmeter. Because a capacitor very nicely limits input below 20 Hz, where the woofer can be easily overloaded. An excellent addition, especially considering that input capacitors on loudspeaker systems are extremely rare due to the high cost of the high-value, high-quality components required. The last two graphs Figs. The details of the test methods are outlined in my review of Definitive Technology's Stu-. The distortion of the Mk-2 was measured in the nearfield, with both systems on the floor in the middle of my listening room. The systems were lying on their side, at right angles to each other, with the bottom of one system facing the top of the other, and were driven in parallel. This configuration allowed the acoustic output of the head unit of one system to properly combine with the port output of the other to form an effective overall response measurement. The sine-wave harmonic distortion of the Mk-2 between 40 and Hz Fig. The second through fifth harmonics were included in the distortion calculations. The measured distortion rose into objectionable ranges only below 25 Hz. Above that frequency, the Mk-2 sounded quite clean, even at the maximum tested power. Interestingly, all three harmonic distortion curves reached minimums at about 60 Hz. This behavior would normally be associated with a speaker's vented-box resonance, but the Ohm's resonant frequency is considerably lower. I determined this by measuring the port's output in the nearfield and finding that it reached a peak at 45 Hz, quite close to the 40 Hz impedance dip seen in Fig. I believe the box tuning is closer to this lower value. This was just one sign that the Ohm Walsh Mk-2, despite its ported cabinet, does not act like a conventional vented-box speaker. The impedance magnitude curve does not show the usual second peak below the box resonance. More important, though the Ohm's distortion is rising below resonance, it does not rise as dramatically as. I believe this is due to the effect of an internal damping blanket stretched across the bottom of the driver cage, just below the woofer-midrange. The air moved by the woofer must pass through this acoustic resistance to reach the inside of the enclosure. This changes the system from a pure vented box into a lossy design, which is somewhat closer to a closed box that doesn't exhibit the rapid rise in distortion below box resonance. The Ohm enclosure's design effectively combines the advantages of a vented box, with its distortion-reducing capabilities at and near box resonance, with the power-handling capability of a closed box at low frequencies. Figure 7b shows the system's twotone intermodulation distortion IM , evaluated at the same power levels as in the previous test. Two equal-level tones, one at Hz and the other swept from 20 to Hz, were applied to the system. The intermodulation sidebands around the higher frequency were evaluated out to the third order, and the test results expressed as a percentage of the energy of the two original test tones. The Ohm's IM was not too objectionable subjectively, even at the watt power level and at 20 Hz. All in all, the Mk-2 did quite well in the harmonic and intermodulation tests. It performed well all the way down to 20 or 25 Hz. The Ohm Walsh Mk-2 speakers were shipped in five separate boxes: This allowed me to unpack and assemble the heavy parts of each speaker separately, which made unpacking and setup a breeze. Assembly consisted of at-. Ohm eases this process by providing a screwdriver with extra long shank to clear the top of the head unit, a nice touch. The head unit is connected to the cabinet by a heavy-duty industrial connector wired with heavy-gauge, audiophile-grade stranded cable. As stated before, connection to the system is via a pair of double-banana jacks mounted somewhat inconveniently on the bottom of the system. I would have preferred having the connectors mounted on the rear, but that would have interfered with the clean look of the cabinet when viewed from behind. Remember that Ohm makes an omnidirectional version of this system for use in surround channels , which might be visible from all four sides. Ohm recommends that, for best imaging and smoothest bass, the Walsh Mk-2 speakers should be spaced wide apart, relatively close to the rear wall, and at least two feet from the corner and side walls. Ohm also suggests a laterally asymmetric room placement to further smooth the bass response. For proper imaging, the speakers should be set up so that the front of each cabinet the side with the Ohm logo faces straight into the room; this ensures that the speakers' main radiation axes cross in front of the listener. Following Ohm's instructions, I set the speakers up about nine feet apart, spaced them about one to two feet from the rear wall, and made sure that each speaker was facing forward and in the correct channel; the right and left systems are marked with arrows normally hidden by the grille that should point towards the center of the room. Once set up, the Ohms looked quite handsometall and slendereven though their appearance is very atypical for speakers, because the grille extends from the top of each cabinet rather than covering about two thirds of its front. The roll-around casters not only added to the. Upgrading Old Ohms Although some mostly high-end electronics can be upgraded to incorporate recent improvements, few speakers can. It's too awkward to ship any but the smallest speakers back to the factory for upgrades, and do-it-yourselfers encounter the problem of removing and replacing glued-in drivers or delving into scratchy fiberglass to remove and replace crossovers. Ohm's Walsh speakers are an exception. An Ohm Walsh speaker's drivers and crossover are part of a one-piece assembly the sealed cage that frustrated Don Keele that's screwed-not glued-in place; this makes installation easy. That leaves a few remaining details, but they're usually simple ones. My own Walsh 4's being odd years old, I thought it time to bring them up to date; that would be a lot cheaper than replacing my old Ohms with new ones. The update made them almost clones of the Mk-2's in the accompanying review. At first, the job looked simple. For my Walshes, the driver can is attached to a squarish board that's secured to the cabinet by four extremely large, easyto-tighten thumbscrews, and a single plug connects the driver can to the cabinet's wiring. To retune the cabinet for the new drivers, I had to slip the old port tube out of the cabinet bottom and replace it with the new one Ohm provided. The company says this retuning yields deeper bass. Owners of Ohms less than about 10 years old have the option of prying out the panel that holds the spring-clip input terminals which accept double-banana plugs and hotgluing a new panel, with multi-way binding posts, in its place. For my ancient Ohm, replacing the panel was not optional. When I took off the old driver assemblies and unpacked the new ones, I discovered that the new assemblies had a two-pin plug and my cabinet had a three-pin connector. That was because Ohm used to mount the crossover on the input panel, but now puts it in the driver cage. It took me and Ohm a while to get that straightened out and for me to receive and install the plugs I needed; luckily, I had other speakers I could use while I waited. In changing the input panel, I lost one feature of the old Walsh: I regret their loss a little, but I can't say whether I really need them or just miss having something to tweak. Ohm's most expensive speaker, the Walsh 5 Mk-2, retains these controls but Ohm's other models don't. According to John Strohbeen,. Ohm's president, these other speakers are designed for specific room sizes, and the Walsh 5 retains these controls "to allow our biggest system to be used in small rooms. But the thumbscrews and screw holes that attach the driver platform to the cabinet are arranged asymmetrically, ensuring that it can only be mounted with the drivers facing front. At first, the new assembly wouldn't drop into position. Then I realized that my cabinets had warped a small fraction of an inch over the years; when I spread their walls slightly with a screwdriver, the driver platforms dropped into place. Because so much time elapsed while the mismatched-plug problem was sorted out, I can't really say how well my upgraded Ohms compare to my original pair. But I can say that they perform almost identically to the Mk-2's, which use the same drivers and crossovers. The old and new cabinets have the same enclosure volume, but different construction. My enclosures are of veneered fiberboard, with sloping sides and heavy internal bracing. Current enclosures are of veneered birch plywood, with straight sides and slightly less bracing. That's enough to add a decibel or two of output between 40 and 60 Hz, which would probably be unnoticeable in normal listening. The price of an upgrade kit varies with the model. Upgrade prices for other models can be found on Ohm's Web site. For speaker upgrades, Ohm's free home trial period is 60 days long, and its limited warranty on parts and labor runs three years-not as long as for new Ohms, but still generous. Frankly, I'm not much concerned about the warranty, since my original Ohms worked without a hitch for more than 20 years. The cabinet's fit and finish were very good, with top-rate coloring and grain on the wood side panels. The Ohms' imaging, soundstaging, and spaciousness were distinctly different. These differences were not quite as apparent when I was sitting in my usual listening position, on the center line between the speakers. But oh, what a difference when I stood up and walked back and forth in front of the speakers, or walked closer to or in between them! The Ohms always maintained a more stable center image as I moved across the room. On most program material, the Ohms created a wide and stable soundstage, very realistic and spacious, with images that extended way behind the rear wall. On material recorded in a large space with significant reverberation such as choral, orchestral, and pipe-organ music , the Ohms' added spaciousness and realism were stunning. I almost always preferred the Ohms' sound on percussion instruments such as cymbals, drum rim shots, wood blocks, bells, etc. I also preferred the Ohms on well-recorded chamber music, where the systems' added spaciousness increased the realism significantly. Often, when I switched from. As an experiment, I tried re-aiming the Walshes, turning them 45 outward facing their inside corners straight into the room so that their axes of maximum radiation would directly face die listening area rather than crossing in front of it. This essentially negated the evenness of the Walshes' side-to-side coverage; but it hardly affected their spaciousness, because the speakers still had significant sound radiation to the sides and rear, which increased room reflections. The Walsh Mk-2's sometimes added an upper-bass chestiness to both male and female vocals, although otherwise the realism added by the Ohms on vocals was very compelling and appealing. The Walsh Mk2's also sounded somewhat distant at times, although this had more to do with their frequency response than with the spaciousness or reverberation that they added. Moving the Ohms closer to the corners elevated the bass level but did not improve the control. The Mk-2's could be played. But they also did justice to more sedate music because of their spaciousness and realism. The Ohm Walsh Mk-2's have some extremely uncommon capabilities. Their nearly sound radiation pattern below 1 kHz, and the way this maximizes room reflections, yields a strikingly realistic soundfield that extends across and between the speakers, and even behind them. This is both an advantage and a disadvantage, because it potentially makes the systems more dependent on room acoustics. The speakers' tailored radiation pattern provides a stable center image and soundstage for listeners located almost anywhere in the listening area, with no need to be equidistant from the loudspeakers. The Ohms add a large degree of spaciousness and airiness to anything that is played through them. Recordings intended to sound dry however, may not be so dry when played through these speakers. And the Ohms' robust bass capability should appeal to even pipe-organ aficionados. The Walsh Mk-2 speakers can also be played loud and clean. Do I like them? But before you run out and buy a pair you should definitely listen to them, to decide if their distinctive sound and uncommon capabilities suit your expectations and desires. Ohm makes this easy by offering a full money-back day home trial, so you can try them out in your own listening setup for up to two months, then return them for full credit if you are displeased. For me, the Ohm Walsh Mk-2's' soundfield-enhancing capabilities outweighed such minor problems as moderate tonal imbalances and the addition of spaciousness to material intended to sound dry. Its cabinet is all curves, with hardly a parallel surface in sight; its only flat surfaces, in fact, are its front baffle and its bottom. Even in a head-on front view, it's saved from conventionality by the curvy transmission-line tweeter enclosure atop the cabinet. This visually arresting design simultaneously addresses the issues of diffraction, standing waves, and rigidity. The bass and midrange are handled by a 6. The deep red cherry pair we auditioned had topnotch fit and finish. The stands, which are available in black or aluminum finish, mount securely to metal plates on the speakers' undersides. There was still adequate bass down to just below 55 Hz, and the speakers were quite flat in the midbass where the response of many mini-monitors is tipped up but delivered a bit of excess energy in the Hz range. In my listening room, I measured a small trough of about 4 dB in the range from to 1, Hz, but on many recordings that's a boon; it also has been shown that a dip in this region seems to add more sense of depth, something the. The step test response to a DC input pulse revealed very good time-alignment between the drivers, although the thirdorder crossovers do not permit true coherence. I set the Nautilus s up in my smaller listening room about cubic feet , placing them four feet out from the front wall. This arrangement gave me decent imaging and flattest overall response, though it somewhat reduced bass extension and impacta common trade-off in speaker placement. The s reproduction of music and voice was clean and wonderfully smooth. The treble reproduction was clean and without audible grain. With a pink-noise test signal, the Nautilus proved to have excellent horizontal and adequate vertical dispersion. As with many speakers, response off the vertical axis dipped at the crossover frequency about 3 kHz , but seated listeners will be on the vertical axis. The slightly editorialized the sound, which I attribute to a slight lower midrange excess and a dip in the upper midrange that I measured with both speakers working together in my room; I did not find the speaker to be as transparent in the midrange as it was in the treble, being a bit too polite British? In the treble, however, the Nautilus definitely outclassed the Paradigms, which tended to have a bit more bite on horns than the horns themselves did. For most of my listening, I used the speakers full-range, driven either by one amplifier or by two separate amps, one feeding the woofer and the other the tweeter terminals of the speaker's crossover passive biamp mode. In my cubic-foot room, they could play loud enough to satisfy me. On occasion, I did hear some glare in the midrange on difficult orchestral material, but only at levels a. I also tried using the Nautilus 's with various subwoofers and cross overs. This combination let me take advantage of the 's strengths, while getting low-distortion bass down into the twenties, and improved the dynamics by increasing headroom generally 4 dB, according to speaker designers I've spoken to. So this combination is more of academic than of practical interest, unless you plan to use the Nautilus 's in a den or as part of a home theater, where there's too little space for big, full-range speakers. The Audio Critics longstanding policy for testing speakers is to combine objective measurements with several listening evaluations, preferably by at least two experienced listeners in at least two different rooms. The laboratory's measurements were taken on a single speaker, quasianechoically to factor out room effects. On-axis frequency response was pretty flat up to about 2. With the conventionally prescribed equilateral triangle listening setup, listeners would be 30 off axis, where response should show some of the elevated treble seen on axis. These are definitely not speakers to toe in so they directly face you. At 45 above axis, the crossover dip extended from 1. Bass response was smooth and free of peaks, pretty close to the classic fourth-order Butterworth response, with a tuning frequency of about 37 Hz. The Nautilus 's impedance does not fall dangerously low; it reaches a minimum of 4. Most amps can handle that, but it would make some marginal amplifiers uncomfortable. Distortion was reasonably, but not spectacularly, low. At a 1-meter SPL of 90 dB,. That's pretty normal performance for a minimonitor. Next, we auditioned the Nautilus 's in The Audio Critics large listening room, which is less well damped than my room and whose listening position is twice as distant. I sug-. This improved things considerably, but neither Peter Aczel nor I were enthralled, and I commented that this performance was much less satisfying than it had been in my quarters. The 's sounded dynamically compressed on operatic recordings. The midrange sounded a bit ragged,. It was no comparison: All in all, I would call the Nautilus a qualified success. It is beautiful in design and construction, carefully engineered, and without significant measurable vices. It can deliver fine sound with small signals, but others in its class can deliver such sound at higher volumes. It has improved drivers, crossover, and bracing, as well as new finishes. Certainly, the driver and crossover improvements may well improve performance in the areas we found challenged in the original, and we would welcome a chance to assess the new version. The Nautilus is recommended, but with qualifications due to its dynamic limitations and lack of ultimate transparency. It may well be your cup of tea; it just wasn't ours. Those are the main, but not the only, differences between the models. Bose was the first company I know of to address the fact that high- and low-frequency noise pose separate problems, and provide separate solutions for each. For the low frequencies, Bose employs active cancellation: Using builtin microphones to pick up the noise, the phones invert the noise signal's polarity and feed it to the transducers in its earcups. Within the earcups,. For higher frequencies, however, cancellation is not practical, because of the shorter wavelengths and, perhaps, higher processing speed involved. In an airliner, headphones that reduce only low-frequency engine noise merely make it easier to hear annoying conversations in other rows. But high frequencies are easier to block than low frequencies. To block them, both the old and new Bose's earcups have hard shells and nonporous cushions that form a good seal against continued on page Tested sample on loan from manufacturer. Music shouldn't have to compete with noise but it always does. In our homes, where it's reasonably quiet, the competition isn't too fierce. But music is so portable these days that we take it with us to noisy places such as airliners. If we want to hear the music, we'd better quash the noise. Bose's original solution to this problem, the QuietComfort headphones, made a good impression on me from the first flight I took with them. They fit comfortably, sounded good, and did a terrific job of keeping ambient noise from competing with the music they were reproducing. Bose's new model, the QuietComfort 2, does all that a little better and a lot more conveniently. AudioControl has always represented no-nonsense engineering and solid value, untainted by either "tweako" cultism or el cheapo massmarketingour kind of manufacturer. Issue No. The two amplifiers under review here appear to be identical, except for 1 the number of channels and 2 the beefier power supply and fatter chassis of the 5-channel model. For that reason, I only tested a couple of channels out of the available 7, under the reasonable assumption that my measurements and conclusions will apply to both models and therefore all 7 channels equally. The two amplifiers are well built; they even possess a certain degree of cosmetic polish, such as we are accustomed to from AudioControl. But of course they are totally lacking in highend affectations such as half-inch thick sculptured front panels and fancy carrying handles. The amplifier operates in Class H; this is a somewhat unusual configuration, based on tiered voltage rails. The 80 to dB min ima for distortion at the lower fre that permit low current draw with. I have no sup porting data. The various output status lights are con solidated in a handsome large win dow. All in all, it's a pretty slick design. The most basic measurement of any power amplifier is distortion ver sus output power at various frequen cies. The channels I tested were vir tually identicaland not particularly impressive, distortionwise. Into a load of 8, clipping occurred just above watts, but this was not the point of minimum distortion as is the case where the distortion is completely noise-dominated. With a 1 kHz input, the distortion curve bottomed out at 16 watts and again at 67 watts, at. The center 0 line shows performance into purely re sistive loads; the others show performance into increasingly reactive loads, capacitive loads to the left and reactive loads to the right. The vertical scale shows output voltage. Output into 8-ohm loads is just as it should be, but power slopes off rapidly at lower im pedances, a sign of power-supply limitations. The power dropoff with reactive loads of 4 ohms or less shows that such loads trigger the amplifier's current limiting. See text. Lowering the loads to 2 greatly exaggerated this anomaly and when it came to 1. Maybe a qualified one. These units aren't exactly cheap, but they are physically attractive and compact packages, and into 8 loads their performance is basically flawless. If you have speakers whose imped ance tends to dip low and turn highly reactive at various frequencies, then there exist better choices in amplifiers. Since the majority of speakers have a nominal impedance of 8, the AudioControl amplifiers can certainly be recommended to drive them. A more sweeping. Only a couple of high-end Sony players I have tested in the past were its equal in that respect, exhibiting no gain-related analog distortion at full scale 0 dB , among other things. I won't even specify the exact numbers, however, because they are basically irrelevant. Its only raison d'tre is the straightthrough digital playback of multichannel recordings in conjunction with the AVR Actually, the AVR is such an exceptional AV receiver that, in its case, I am almost resigned to the astronomical retail price tag. Don't misunderstand me. Of course it is. But the difference is in general solidity, smoothness of operation, a few extra features, subtle video detail, etc. A few features of the DVD are worth noting. Rich dismissed in Issue No. As for progressive scan, it is undoubtedly an important advancement in video resolution, but it requires a compatible TV monitor. Among its new features the most important and impressive by far other than the highly specialized Denon Link is the Dolby Pro Logic II decoding capability. For the first time, there can be no argument about playing even conventional stereo recordings, not just 5. It's a considerable improvement over the earlier Dolby Pro Logic. The sound field is more convincing, beginning to approach discrete 5. As far as video performance is concerned, I noticed no significant differences from the AVR There remains the Denon Link to be subjectively evaluated, and that's a problem. My exposure to the DVDcum-AVR combination has been relatively brief; I would really need more time and a greater variety of multichannel program material to fine-tune my aural perception of the difference between the two modesif any. It makes sense. It's the way things should have been done since the beginning. That bass management is now possible with DVD-Audio signals, which it wasn't through the six external analog connections, is alone a considerable advantage. Unfortunately, the Denon Link does not work with copy-protected discs. Those discs don't know the difference between a proprietary and a generic digital connection. Don't blame Denon, however, for the idiocy of the recording industry. Sony Electronics, Inc. For starters, there are the usual advantages of combining components: And with a multichannel setup capable of playing SACDs, these advantages are even more pronounced; for example, the Sony's direct internal digital connection from player to receiver eliminates the need for as many as eleven cables for 5. Putting an SACD player and receiver in one box provides a secure digital interface. Including these systems on an SACD player would further raise its cost. In theory, a player-receiver combination like this Sony permits implementation of such features. Unfortunately, my review showed that this was but one of the capabilities the AVDS50ES lacked, despite its advanced technology in other areas. Sony has chosen to use its S-Master digital power-amp design, which is based on its one-bit, deltasigma modulation technology. In the SMaster design, all signal processing within the unit takes place in the digital domainbut in pulse-code modulation PCM , not one-bit, form. The radio-frequency energy of the one-bit signal present at the power MOSFETs' output is removed by passive filter circuits, and the filtered signal is sent directly to the speaker terminals. However, as we'll explore later, audiophiles won't find this approach optimal now, and possibly not ever. In discussing the design of its digital power amp, Sony's press release states that "this one-bit signal can, in effect, be turned into an analog signal simply by filtering out the digital sampling frequency, so that the signal appearing at the speaker terminal is essentially the digital signal itself. This is no problem with standalone SACD players, whose low-voltage output signals are normally carried via shielded cables. But such signals won't do as output to the speaker terminals, where signal amplitudes are higher and the unshielded cables used could act as antennas, broadcasting the noise. Since switching voltages between two levels in the Sony design generate out-of-band signal components, the noise must be filtered out. In the AVD-S50ES, this filtering happens in the amplifier output stage, where voltages are comparatively high and currents fairly large at the Sony's rated power watts per channel into 6 ohmsoutput amplitude is about 25 volts rms, with about 4 rms amperes of current ; this calls for pas-. Furthermore, the rise and fall times of the digital signals at the speaker terminals, and the time uncertainty as to when the switching occurs capture jitter , create opportunities for noise and distortion to arise. This is the Holy Grail of switching-amplifier design, with analog signals present only at the speaker terminals. While pure digital solutions are the most elegant implementations, it is generally agreed that switching amplifiers of ultimate quality will require an analog feedback loop around the digital section, to reduce the distortion introduced by the nonideal waveforms the MOSFETs produce. The issues are the timing of the switch's turning on and off and the shape of the waveform as it rises and falls. The Sony can handle several forms of surround: The front left, center, and right speakers were matched AR 's. The rear channels were Monitor Audio Studio 6 speakers, which. All the speakers were equidistant from my ears and mounted in the same vertical plane. Monopole speakers like mine should also be several feet from any wall and were , though this is less critical for surround speakers. However, moving the center. Distance compensation was more effective when moving the rear channels closer in than it was for movement of the center channel. Moving the center speaker farther from the listener than the left and right ones creates a cavity effect, with some of the center speaker's sound scattering from the sides and back of the other front-speaker cabinets. And when the center speaker is moved closer to the listener, it blocks or scatters sound from the left and right front speakers. More problems arise when the speakers are used for home theatersee sidebar, "The Center-Channel Conflict. The placement of the surroundchannel speakers also proved important. Improper placement, with the rears not the same distance from the listener as the main speakers, caused some instruments to wander into the rear channels. Although the rears should be about the same distance from the listener as the front speakers, they. The diagrams in the Sony manual and the Telarc CD booklets basically describe this setup, which is optimized for music listening and differs from the optimal layout for movies. Using Sony's and Telarc's recommended layout was no problem for meI don't do movies. For almost everybody else, movie placement wins. The original Pro Logic delivers an okay sort of surround from stereo recordings, even though it was not designed for that. Nacked ladies with big boobs. Dildo pussy ass gif. Blonde threesome with 2 guys. Teenage girls volleyball shorts. Crying mexican girl fucked. Random Gallary Girls partying passing out nude. Nude havertown pa woman. Sexy hot long legs. Clit piecing video. Home toy teens fuck. Porn body painting girl. Sex Dating. New Pics Tanning bed hand bra Girl guy straight threesome two Maxillo facial and oral surgeon Chat gay latino mt tb. All models on www. All galleries and links are provided by 3rd parties. We have no control over the content of these pages. We take no responsibility for the content on any website which we link to, please use your own discretion while surfing the porn links. Choking free abuse porn. There's less maintenance and no tune-ups, and after each race a recharge from his portable generator costs about 30 cents. I ask him how the car feels when he takes off. I cover the first 60 feet in 1. You feel the acceleration pull your face back. I do one-eighth of a mile in 6 seconds, reaching mph. The last eighth, the performance falls off because I have no transmission. So, this is the right thing to do - for ecology, and to get kids interested in the whole idea. Well, all right! I squeeze into the seat, scraping my knees on the aluminum body and bumping my head on the roll bar. Don't even think of touching it. That would initiate the race sequence. I imagine myself fumbling for it as the car winds up and shoots toward the chain-link perimeter fence feet away. Probably I could hit the switch around the same time the car hit the fence. Still, this is no time to wimp out. I press it, and the car rolls forward. There's no suspension, so I feel every crack in the asphalt. The dragster makes an electric grinding noise, like an old-fashioned streetcar. The "pit area" at Woodburn is a desolate expanse like an abandoned parking lot. Finally I wrestle it back to his trailer. Electronerds race machines crammed full of batteries that deliver surges of power up to 1, amps. A couple hours later the gas-guzzlers arrive: The race fee is only 20 bucks, and you can make as many runs down the track as time permits. I walk among the cars as they line up with their engines rumbling, while the drivers' girlfriends sit on the bleachers eating corn dogs and drinking 7-Up. Then the racing starts, and it sounds as if tigers are being tortured here among the wheat fields. Screaming tires, roaring motors - it's a testosterone-fueled, head-hammering ritual as the drivers pair off like elks banging their antlers together at the start of the mating season. Bearing in mind that "knee trembler" was s Liverpudlian slang for a stand-up blow job, it's no surprise to see the vocabulary of fuel injection and blowers superchargers perverted in a dashboard sticker that reads, "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown. In fact, this event reeks even more of sublimated sex than of exhaust fumes - and the noise is an intrinsic element. He spins the fat tires to warm the rubber for better adhesion, and then - he's gone! His dragster drifts away like a bird on the breeze, easily outpacing his rival, a 5-liter behemoth that bellows futilely as it falls behind. The gasoline-car drivers look at each other as if to say, What the fuck? If a man with a high-powered rifle wandered into a primitive tribe where they'd been duking it out with wooden clubs, I imagine the reaction would be the same. The technology gap is so extreme, it makes the whole game seem pointless. The next day - Saturday - the gas-guzzlers are gone and the pit area is invaded by smart, hairy geeks swigging Evian water and chattering jargon like speed freaks. Every one of them is male, except for some wives and girlfriends. Yes, the electronerds are here - and the bleachers are empty. The event was listed in the track's calendar, but the locals have chosen to stay home. Still, there's no shortage of cars and drivers. Roderick Wilde's Maniac Mazda RX7 is a fearsome creation, crammed full of batteries and looking slightly beat-up, like a prize fighter with a history. John Wayland has brought his White Zombie, cranked to a higher voltage and plastered with slogans: Question internal combustion Plasma Boy Racing. The explosion generated a terrifying ball of blue plasma crackling with electric discharges. Not far away, Don Crabtree, a sewing-machine design engineer, stands by his record-breaking volt motorcycle powered by wheelchair batteries. I wander over to a red Toyota MR2, as shiny as if it just came out of a showroom. Its owner is Bob Boyd, a white-haired Air Force veteran. This is more fun. He retired 24 years ago, but at 78, he still loves speed and, like most electric racers, is a self-taught engineer. So, you learned to do it yourself. Kids who grow up around farms are pretty handy with tools. He consulted John Wayland before tackling his project, then spent about 18 months working on it. So, I built this for fun. It draws up to 1, amps from 16 batteries, volts. To recharge it, I just plug it into a standard volt outlet. Boyd's car is immaculately executed; the only clue that it's not a regular Toyota is the electric plug hiding where a gas filler pipe should be. Boyd financed the conversion without any sponsors. So, I took a pretty nice car and tore it up, converted it. You could do the same thing a lot cheaper. His maximum range is 40 miles between recharges, but he feels this is perfectly adequate. Why don't they drive an electric? It's a whole bunch cheaper, like burning fuel at 14 cents a gallon. And of course it's nonpolluting. But the open combustion of coal or natural gas in power stations is inherently more efficient than an internal combustion engine, which creates noxious gases and a huge amount of waste heat. Also, as Boyd points out, hydroelectric power produces no pollutants at all. Therefore, electric vehicles really do have the potential to reduce emissions nationwide. Also, if millions of Americans went electric, existing power plants might still satisfy the demand, because most recharging would be done at night, when the load is lowest. I question Boyd about the valuable metals locked up inside batteries. In response, he claims that the modern lead-acid batteries used in almost all amateur car conversions are 95 percent recyclable. When I talk to other builders at the event, they give me the same well-practiced pro-electric sales pitch - and it's persuasive. Not all the vehicles are finished as meticulously as Boyd's, but most are good-looking and practical. They really could replace conventional automobiles under many everyday conditions. Racing, though, may not be the killer app that the advocates are looking for. The cars move so silently, you can forget that anything's happening on the track. It's like an action movie with the sound turned off. Up in the control tower, I ask the track owner which of his events attracts the biggest crowd. His answer is no surprise: Most people want to see insanely powerful, nitro-fueled monsters that shoot jets of flame out their pipes and make so much noise that you feel your internal organs vibrating in sympathy. Electric-powered race cars have novelty value - maybe even shock value - among auto aficionados, but they remove fetish elements that are deeply embedded in car culture. When you suppress the animal growl of a hot rod and quench its stinking breath, you emasculate it - and the drama dies. Electric dragsters seem unlikely to grab much airtime on ESPN. They can still serve an important function, though, because auto racing has always been a test bed for new technologies that eventually find their way into consumer products..

No radio, because that's fun. No carpeting, because it might be some animal fiber. Well, Tsakiridis amplifiers suck not going to play their game anymore.

We are starting a new game. Now 47, Wayland taught check this out auto engineering by building gasoline-powered hot rods as a kid. But also I worked with electricity - I always had battery-powered toys. I could see that electricity could be the way to go. In he took the first step: Initially he used just eight Tsakiridis amplifiers suck batteries, and his own controller.

After perfecting the Tsakiridis amplifiers suck, Wayland grossly underestimated its power throughput when he tried to back out of his driveway. Plus, I burned rubber all the way into the street. There's so much torque from the motor, it cracks gears. When the damage was fixed, he managed a test run - and was pulled over by the police.

For more than a decade Wayland remained an electrified radical lost in the smog, with few disciples. Finally, in the s, the rest of the world started to catch up with him. In Phoenix, auto-racing enthusiasts Mike Shaw and Don Karner rented a track and staged the world's first all-electric drag race, which became Tsakiridis amplifiers suck annual event.

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Wayland entered it in with another '72 Datsun, named White Zombie after the heavy-metal band. This car used an Tsakiridis amplifiers suck modified forklift truck voltage controller - which turned out to be dead on arrival, leaving him with no way to moderate the power. In desperation he switched the full battery voltage with two huge relays, so that the car was either "on" or "off. At the same event, General Motors entered the prototype of its electric vehicle, the EV1, which the company raced against another amp-hungry maniac: Roderick Wilde, a tall, bearded, long-haired, leather-clad figure who looks more like a biker gang member than a race-car driver.

In fact, he rides Tsakiridis amplifiers suck big Suzuki motorcycle, and sometimes wears a black beret with "Born to be Wilde" hand-embroidered around the edge.

Wilde Tsakiridis amplifiers suck already racked up his own string of dubious achievements. We went so fast they eliminated our race class because it was too dangerous.

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At the drag races, Wilde adds, "the announcer got my name wrong and the name of Tsakiridis amplifiers suck car wrong, but I beat GM's car by two whole seconds. The three of them discussed creating their own affiliation: A whole new racing category now exists for the "amp suckers. And I decided to check them out. Forty miles south of Portland I take the Woodburn exit from I-5 and follow a two-lane blacktop across flat wheat fields punctuated with barns and old wooden farmhouses.

After a couple of miles I find the Woodburn Dragstrip: Today, Friday, a marquee-style sign outside the strip proclaims "Street-legal drags.

The electronerds aren't scheduled till tomorrow - click some of them are turning up anyway. The navy blue Tsakiridis amplifiers suck is decorated with spiffy electric-discharge patterns in special reflective paint.

He's suntanned, amiable, low-key, without the edge that you'd expect from a Tsakiridis amplifiers suck maniac. In fact his modest manner and large-lensed glasses make him look like a clerical worker - although the appearance is deceptive. I'd tweak them and soup up the motors, race against other kids in the neighborhood - and take their cars home with me.

His first real car was a '65 Buick Grandsport, which he raced in suburban Connecticut. The cops would be there, but there were too many of us for them to do much about it. We'd make the windows rattle on the McDonald's. You could get octane Sunoco back then, for 29 cents a gallon. One night, when he was Tsakiridis amplifiers suck alone, a couple of patrol cars pursued him. I made a turn onto a side street, but at the end of it was an entrance to a football field, with two steel posts.

I had my lights off, and I ran right into both those posts. They mashed both my fenders, all the way Tsakiridis amplifiers suck to my doors. I was just jammed in there and couldn't get out, and the cops arrived and started laughing at me. They'd given me tickets before for speeding and reckless driving.

After that I Tsakiridis amplifiers suck allowed to drive for four years, so I went into the Air Force. I repaired their welder in five minutes and talked to the guy for three hours about an electric dragster. I Tsakiridis amplifiers suck, 'Let's do it! I have 28 batteries, giving volts at 1, amps. The cables are about an inch in diameter.

How a bunch of speed-hungry, rubber-burning, adrenaline-pumped environmentalists get their kicks.

There's less maintenance Tsakiridis amplifiers suck no tune-ups, and after each race a recharge from his portable generator costs about 30 cents. I ask him how the car Tsakiridis amplifiers suck when he takes off. I cover the first 60 feet in 1. You feel the acceleration pull your face back. I do one-eighth of a mile in 6 seconds, reaching mph. The last eighth, the performance falls off because I have no transmission. So, this is the right thing to do - for ecology, and to get kids interested in the whole idea.

Well, all right!

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I squeeze into the seat, scraping my knees on the aluminum body and bumping my head on the roll bar. Don't even think of touching it. That would initiate the Tsakiridis amplifiers suck sequence. I imagine myself fumbling Tsakiridis amplifiers suck it as the car winds up and shoots toward the chain-link perimeter fence feet away. Probably I could hit the switch around the same time the car hit the fence. Still, this is no time to wimp out. I press it, and the car rolls forward.

There's no suspension, so I feel every crack in the asphalt. The dragster makes an electric grinding Tsakiridis amplifiers suck, like an old-fashioned streetcar. The "pit area" at Woodburn is a desolate expanse like Tsakiridis amplifiers suck abandoned parking lot.

Finally I wrestle it back to his trailer. Electronerds race machines crammed full of batteries that deliver surges of power up to 1, amps. A couple hours later the gas-guzzlers arrive: The race fee is only 20 bucks, and you can make as many runs down the track as time permits. I walk among the cars as they line up with their engines Tsakiridis amplifiers suck, while the drivers' girlfriends sit on the bleachers eating corn dogs and drinking 7-Up.

Then the racing starts, and it sounds as if tigers are being tortured here among the wheat fields. Screaming tires, roaring motors - it's a testosterone-fueled, head-hammering ritual as the drivers pair off like games to sexy play Fun banging their antlers together at the start of the mating season. tsakiridis amplifiers suck | cat doll download free pussy | teen love poetry | bowling for soup gay | black male nude photography white | Tsakiridis amplifiers suck bbclone.

Also in this issue: Reviews of AV electronics, power amplifiers, and assorted other electronic components and accessories.

The $98 Stereo Bluetooth Speaker That Doesn'T Suck. Mcintosh Audio, Blue Meters, Mac Amplifiers, Mcintosh Group, World Of Mcintosh. Audioplan, Jadis, Musicable, Sicomin, Norma, Article source, Lovan, Atl. We've been following the saga of the amazing White Zombie, a '72 Datsun that runs low 12s on pure electrons, for quite some time now. Reviews of AV electronics, power amplifiers, and assorted other "If you can't lick'em.

etc. in the real world there were huge problems— efficiency. which I can confidently tell—because I was there. however. Tsakiridis Aeolos Super Plus. Because to my dad, it all sounded the same and it all sucked! really promising and reasonably-priced tube amps from Tsakiridis in Greece; Vanatoo Tsakiridis amplifiers suck. Botox facial in raleigh Tsakiridis amplifiers suck

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